Is this correct grammar?  These five steps, based on research, have helped hundreds of thousands of smokers quit and stay quit.?

Stay quit sounds off to me.

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  • 1 year ago
    Favourite answer

    "Stay quit" sounds off to me as well. While the point is clear, it seems to be more informal. 

    It would make more sense to write "These five steps, based on research, have helped hundreds of thousands of smokers to quit permanently".

    Alternately, "...to quit for good" or "...quit without relapsing", would also make more sense.  

  • 1 year ago

    "Stay quit" is ungrammatical.  "Quit" is a verb, not an adjective.

  • 1 year ago

    It is grammatical.  As written, though, it says that the five steps are based on research, and not that the results of quitting and staying quit is demonstrated by research.

  • ?
    Lv 6
    1 year ago

    sounds dandy

    jvdvjjvifjvifji

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Yes. The addition of stay quit is to emphasize that, after quitting, the quitters don't relapse or pick up smoking again. Instead of "and stay quit", it could have been "and quit for good" or, simply, "for good," meaning forever.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    "Stay quit" sounds somewhat colloquial ("quit" usualy isn't used as a adjective), but I don't see why it can't be used. If "quit" is considered only a verb and not also an adjective, you've just shown a reason why it *should* be considered as both. I can't think of a more succinct and memorable way of saying what you're saying.

  • 1 year ago

    'Stay quit' IS 'off' but in this informal context it's fine. Changing the wording destroys the emphasis that repetition of 'quit' supplies.

  • 1 year ago

    I agree that "stay quit" is too informal for an academic paper.  "stop smoking" is sufficient by itself, or "stop smoking permanently." 

  • 1 year ago

    I would say "quit and remain free of tobacco addiction."

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Grammar is correct, and "stay quit" is acceptable colloquially. I prefer doing something with the choppy "based on research" pause. It is unnecessary, because if it has helped hundreds of thousands of smokers, that's already the justification. Or, put it at the beginning if you want it. The research was done first.

    These five steps have helped hundreds of thousands of smokers quit and stay quit.

    Based on research, these five steps have helped hundreds of thousands of smokers quit and stay quit.

    Or, if you don't like "stay quit"-

    These five steps have helped hundreds of thousands of smokers quit forever.

    These five steps have helped hundreds of thousands of smokers quit permanently.

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