Is paying rent the only time people use checks anymore ?

Have debit cards almost completely wiped out checks 

26 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    Businesses use checks with surprising frequency...

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    how should we know how people handle their money? everyone's different!!

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  • 2 months ago

    if your smart buy an old house there's 1million 4000 out in the communties 90 percent fixable choose a good nabour hood you can buy it under five grand god bless america fix the world you fix yourself

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  • 2 months ago

    No, that is not the only reason to use a check.

    Sometimes it makes more sense (or is your only choice) to use a paper check instead of another means of payment. Here are several ways checks can be more convenient, save you money, or protect your finances: 

    Some Businesses Charge Extra Fees for Credit Card Payments. Utility companies and government agencies may accept credit or debit cards, but only through third-party processors. These payment processors charge a fee every time you use a credit card to make a payment. 

    You Can Pay During Utility Outages. Stores rely on electronic equipment to process debit and credit card transactions. If the power or phone systems are down in your area, checks and cash are likely to be the only way you’ll be able to make a purchase. Since the ATMs are also likely to be out of service, a paper check may be the only way that you can buy food and other necessary supplies for you and your family. 

    Some Businesses Prefer Paper Checks or Money Orders. As strange as it may seem, some businesses don’t accept credit or debit card payments. These businesses include insurance agents and companies, some government offices, tradespeople, organizations (such as churches, fraternal lodges, and community groups) that charge dues or accept donations, and landlords. You may also occasionally encounter an old-fashioned retail business owner who abhors plastic but who is happy to take your check. 

    Some Retail Shops Enforce a Minimum Credit Card Purchase. Credit card processors and banks charge businesses a fee when customers pay with a credit card. This fee can take a big bite out of small purchases, so many businesses set a minimum amount for credit card purchases. If you don’t have another form of payment, this could result in you wasting money on an item you don’t need in order to meet the minimum. There’s no fee to deposit a check, so there’s generally no minimum purchase required. 

    Checks are Traceable. If traceability is important to you and the payee doesn’t accept debit or credit cards, paper checks offer a level of traceability that you can’t get from money orders, cashier’s checks, automatic bill pay systems, or cash. When you mail someone a paper check, you can select the type of mail service that you want to use, along with a tracking method. (Being able to document the mailing date of a payment can be important with some types of payments, such as insurance premiums or taxes.) Once your check clears, you’ll have access to a copy of the canceled check through your bank. If there is any dispute over your payment, you can easily produce your mailing receipt and provide the business or creditor with a copy of your canceled check. If you paid with a money order, particularly a non-bank money order, tracing the payment can be costly and time-consuming. 

    Gift Giving. Gift recipients can deposit your check into their bank accounts and spend the cash however they like, unlike gift cards, which may be restricted to a merchant, can only be used at merchants that accept a particular credit card brand, or charge fees for maintenance or cash withdrawals at an ATM. 

    Checks Are Less Costly Than Money Orders. My bank charges five dollars for a money order. Even postal money orders cost over a dollar each, more if issued in international currency. Non-bank money orders often cost less, but their issuers may charge high tracing or replacement fees if the money order is lost or destroyed. Of course, there are circumstances where money orders are more appropriate, such as when a payee asks for guaranteed funds or you need to complete a financial transaction quickly without waiting for a check to clear.

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  • 2 months ago

    I've never written a check.

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  • 2 months ago

    yes ..................................

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    When I pay rent I either pay with cash, or I am willing to do an automatic deposit from my bank account into someone else's bank account.

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  • DEBS
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I have never used a debit card.  For me, Point of Sale transactions are credit card (paid every month) or cash.  Debit cards are not as secure and don't give rewards as compared to a credit card.  Unless someone can't get a credit card or is completely incompetent in sticking to a budget, then a debit card is very old school.  

    I write about 3 checks a year for random companies who don't have options.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I still write checks

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I know that's the ONLY time *I* use cheques.  It has been that way for some time now, and back was in was in college, I had a job at a store, and always rolled my internal eyes when somebody paid for their purchases, especially if they "balanced their book" before even writing their name.  (I'm guessing these people had black landlines with dials, called aluminium foil "tinfoil" and reheated things in a double boiler.)

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