Have I done anything wrong with my photo?

I had the ISO at 800 had it fully zoomed in had the aperture at F.9 and I had my dot sensor in the middle of the diamond and it came out clear once I looked through the viewing screen just incase I wanted to put it in the trash and my friend said the bird could of been clearer the exposure was dead in the middle of the line saying I have the right amount of light and I had the settings on clear sky with the sun

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    You need to get into your camera owner's manual and study about how to adjust AUTO FOCUS POINT SELECTION. If you have the camera set in full auto focus mode, it is going to focus on an area that is closest to the camera. You need to learn how to be in control of EXACTLY WHERE the camera focuses. You do this by moving the focus POINT onto the bird. Again, READ AND STUDY YOUR CAMERA MANUAL about this.

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  • 2 months ago

    Yes. There is very little depth of field to play with here and and your camera focused on the lichen covered twigs to the bottom right of the bird. There's a little underexposure but that could be corrected in post processing. Sharpening though won't get the bird back in focus.   If your camera had focus peaking you could have seen the mistake and corrected it. Or maybe you could have magnified the focus point to take a look?

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  • 2 months ago

    The bird is behind the plane of focus, you are focused on the twigs in front of the bird. Common problem with autofocus in this kind of situation. You don't say what lens or focal length you have here, or which camera. With some models of camera the ability to use manual focus is good, with others not so much.

    If your lens has a manual focus over ride while in auto focus mode, this is the time you use it. Let the lens get close, then tweak it manually. It takes practice and hopefully a camera with a viewfinder that lets you actually see what you are doing. You may also wish to lock your autofocus on the center point only, which can make the focus a little more consistent but is still not going to get it right every time.

    I shoot a lot of birds with a Nikon D7500 (good viewfinder for an APS-C body) and a Sigma 150-600C, which has the manual override while in AF mode. After much practice, I can get the bird focused in the middle of a tree this way. I generally use ISO 400 on a sunny day at f/8, just to keep the shutter speed as high as possible.

    I think the exposure is slightly under as well, but that is easily corrected. What isn't so easy is to fix the focus issue in this shot.

    Keep practicing, the results can be very satisfying but expect a lot of missed shots in the process.

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  • John
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The others did the technical photography stuff. I'll just say that it looks like the sun is about to set. Not a sunny day.

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  • 2 months ago

    The photo is out of focus and underexposed. 

    If you had a clear, sunny sky there is no reason to set your ISO at 800. If you're metering correctly and focusing on the bird your ISO should be 200 or 250 on a sunny day. The f stop will depend on whether you just want the bird in focus or everything else.

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  • 2 months ago

    It might be a little underexposed.  Metering is difficult with bright sun because there's sun and shade.  But I think the real problem is focus.  It's very hard for the camera to autofocus on something like this, a bird surrounded by branches and twigs in front and behind.  It's like taking a picture through a window and the camera focuses on the window.

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    • Whatever
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      If you set your focus area properly on your camera then it really isn't difficult to focus solely on the bird.

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