Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality Β· 2 months ago

Does anyone have any good stories of people acting up during services at a church, mosque, synagogue, or temple?

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    One time, while I was attending Friday services at a mosque I used to visit frequently, there was an announcement after the prayer regarding the glass windows on the front door, which were broken earlier that week in what everyone had assumed to be an act of anti-Muslim vandalism. It was announced that someone's young children had been caught on camera breaking the windows while playing, throwing stones and bricks at the door while their parents were socializing, and that the Islamic Society was looking for the parents of the children so that the mosque could be reimbursed for the damages. There was another time where a mosque got burnt down by a member of the congregation, who attended five times a day, seven days a week no less, and nobody was ever able to figure out why he did it, but he's in prison now.

    Also, at the mosque I currently attend most, there was a disabled teen banging and screaming. Since this happened almost immediately after the Christchurch shooting, people thought that it was another shooting. It really did sound like someone firing a shotgun. So the police and security guards on-site all start running to the noise, where they find this teenager just freaking out and banging, and they had to get his dad to come calm him down. It was okay though.

    Normally, the worst that ever happens is people will leave their cellphones on during services and they'll start ringing, often with their prayer alarms. People also park in inappropriate places a lot, blocking exits and entrances, and they have to make announcements for someone to move the vehicle. Occasionally, if you're a non-Sunni praying at a Sunni mosque, someone will bother you for it since non-Sunnis (e.g. Shi'ites, Ibadis, Qur'anists) typically pray with their hands at their sides, while most Sunnis pray with their hands at their navel or chest. At the mosque I normally attend there is a strong Sunni majority, though imams there have in the past reminded congregants not to bother Shi'ites like me for attending the mosque, since it is supposed to be open to everyone.

    At a mosque I used to attend I had someone bother me because I was wearing a shirt with a fleur de lis on it (I'm ethnically French, Hispanic, and Native American), saying that the shirt represented the Trinity of the Christians, but that was the first I'd ever heard of it and for me it simply represented my birthplace and heritage, and it was one of the only nice shirts I had at the time, so I stopped going there almost entirely after that.

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  • Mintee
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    you mean like my younger sibling running up and down the isle yelling and laughing playing mock cowboys and indians pretending to shoot at people... well yes..

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  • misty
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Not me, I have never been to one.

    • jon pike
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      That kinda explains a lot. Opinionated without experience; the reality of the fool.

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  • 2 months ago

    Yes. I do..........

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  • 2 months ago

    i was just recently removed from my apartment near BYU campus. i was ready to leave the state because of religious persecution but mostly because of my roommates. i dreams of angels. and with that as inspiration, i stood up in a singles ward and called everyone to repentance. hence i was immediately ushered out. and later i was told the leadership quoted some verse about doing things in an orderly manner. of course when i left the building it was said that the stake president called the police and said someone was dealing drugs in the parking lot. the police car drove up on ME, while i was trying to find my cat. and the officer told me about the call, i denied it, he asked me if i was a member of the church i said yes, and as i saw a woman leave the building, She looked like a witch so i yelled at her to repent of her sins of witchcraft, and i began looking for my cat again by "whistling" and sure enough the officer thought i had gone "crazy" but also sure enough, my cat knew my whistle and i walked over to where she was and picked her up. all because of the dream of an angle. i was also told later that some underground paper did write a story about the incident inside the building. it was the only time in my life that i had that "burning in the bosom" if that's what i felt.

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  • 2 months ago

    No, the people who attend my church are rational adults.

    Source(s): Greek Orthodox Christian
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  • Davros
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Nah, I didn't witness any epic meltdowns whilst I was still in a church sadly.

    I heard about one guy who a friend had to help drag out of the building when he started screaming "I curse you with the evil eye!" over and over again, mantra-like at some woman who'd jilted him. Nothing and no one would calm him down or shut him up. Wish I'd witnessed that as it sounded hilarious.

    He kept on screaming it outside the building and banging on the glass. He finally relented when congregation members threatened to call the police.

    About the most annoying thing I ever had to deal with was when I was working at the chapel as an usher. We had a new convert in the congregation who had come from one of the more "charismatic" denominations of Christianity. Our denomination was big on high church style reverence and decorum. But this old bloke couldn't seem to get his head around the idea of staying quiet during a church service.

    Randomly during meetings, the guy would suddenly pop up out of his seat like a jack in the box, raise up his hands to the air and shout "Praise Jeeeeesus!" Shattering the air of tranquillity and reflection.

    Each time he did it, the rest of the congregation would give him a passive aggressive glare. But it did no good. Some speaker would say something vaguely spiritual and he'd be out of his seat again, arms raised like he was in a stick up, yelling yet another variant of "In the name of Jeeeeeesus!"

    Unfortunately I was the usher, and it was my job to have to pat him on the shoulder, and whisper to him to stay in his seat and not to talk during the service. Each time he'd give me a look like I'd just p!ssed on his wife. I was also starting to get dirty looks from the Bishop for not having got the guy to stop being disruptive.

    That was a lonnnnng service, and I thoroughly expected to get a bollocking at the end of it. (never did tho)

    The guy didn't last in the church very long. He clearly couldn't keep his love for Jesus quiet!

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  • 2 months ago

    Left on our own, at 4 & 5 respectively, my sister & I began wrestling in the pew. We were on the right, by the aisle and about 3/4 of the way back. The lady in front of us, I still remember. It was the 70s. She was black, had a medium afro and a tasteful white blouse on. She turned and shushed us and we stopped.

    Remember when it took a village? People most likely to believe in the village are the ones least open to strangers shushing their kids. "How dare you?"

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  • I remember this one time when I was about 10, there was a little boy around my own age who suddenly yelled that he had to go to the bathroom. His mom tried to shush him and told him the pastor was talking, and he yelled, "He's BORING!"

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  • 2 months ago

    My friend once got the hiccups so bad during the service everyone could hear. He interrupted the sermon and asked "Is there a hiccup doctor in the house?" It cracked everyone up.

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