I was born in the UK in 1965 and my family moved to Canada. I am retired now and want to move back. What do I need todo?

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Get your British passport, research the area where you would like to live, housing costs etc if you are married and your spouse is not a British citizen then you need to also research a spousal visa........then it is about costing if it is worth transporting furniture or selling and buying in the UK once there register with the local GP, register on the electoral roll, local council etc etc

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  • 2 months ago

    IF you held UK citizenship prior to your family's move to Canada, you should have kept your UK passport current all these years. You did not lose your UK citizenship. If you failed to maintain your passport all these years, you have to prove you were UK citizen & get another UK passport prior to moving back to UK.

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  • 2 months ago

    Pretty much just move.  Getting a British passport would help, but, they cannot stop you.

    Curious though:  I came with my family in 1959. I've been back a few times, but, still find Canada to be a better place to live.  I am wondering why you think differently!

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  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Make sure your British passport is valid and just go. Once there you'll of course have to register with the NHS and all that. But if you were just born there and aren't a UK citizen...that would be an entirely different story.

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  • 2 months ago

    The first thing you need to do is renew or apply for a Great British passport if you do not already have one.  In 1965 being born in the UK made you automatically a British subject so, if you do not have your full birth certificate you will need to order that from the GRO.

    The second thing you need to do is work out whether you can afford to do this.  Costs vary enormously across the UK.  Where were you thinking of living?  You will be able to continue to receive your Canadian pension and you will be free to take your savings with you but you will not receive much in the way of benefits from the UK.   Indeed you will not be considered fully a 'settled person' until you have lived there for 3 years.  Some benefits such as a UK state pension are only available to those who contributed into the scheme.

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  • 2 months ago

    Between 1949 and 1982, birth in the UK or a Crown Colony was sufficient in itself to confer the status of Citizen of United Kingdom and Colonies (CUKC), irrespective of the parents' status, although only CUKCs with a connection to the UK (i.e. birth in the UK or has a UK-born parent or grandparent) had right of abode in the UK after 1971 and would eventually become British citizens in 1983. CUKCs without a connection to the UK became either British Overseas Territories citizens or British Overseas citizens in 1983, depending on whether they had a connection to another BOT.

    The only exception to this rule were children of diplomats and enemy aliens. This exception did not apply to most visiting forces, so, in general, children born in the UK before 1983 to visiting military personnel (e.g. US forces stationed in the UK) were CUKCs connected to the UK and would become British citizens in 1983, albeit as a second nationality.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_nationality_...

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  • ..
    Lv 6
    2 months ago
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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    have you got an English passport. if not apply for one and state where born. then don't give up

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