Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Family & RelationshipsFamily · 8 months ago

Why is it so common for the American (born & raised) children to reject their immigrant parent’s culture?

My location has lots of US born children with immigrant parents. I notice how a lot of them reject their parent’s native culture. For example - the kid might refuse to speak their parent’s language, they likely disagree with their parents values & beliefs and want to be seen as American ONLY!!! During school age, some kids also go through a phase of feeling misunderstood. They know that they’re not like their parents but other people (strangers) also view them as foreign because of how they look. 

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  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    When kids get to a certain age their friends begin to hold more significance in their lives than their parents. Peer pressure and group think being what it is these children would rather fit in at school even if it means they battle with their parents at home.

  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    cause they dont like the culture

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    I live in canada but you're basically describing me. I'm indian and born here. I have never been to India. I don't speak the language. I don't celebrate any indian holidays or festivities. I am not religious (ii am atheist and parents are Sikh). I'm not into the indian culture in any way.

    I am Canadian and I am my own person. I live my life to make me happy. I will not please my parents at the expense of losing my identity. My culture is canada. Is there a rule stating I must act a certain way or follow or a certain lifestyle because of the colour of my skin or where my parents were born? No. I'm born and raised in Canada therefore this is my culture.

  • 8 months ago

    You asked why children reject their immigrant parent's culture. It is because children want to be accepted by their peers. When children adapt their parent's customs, they are treated as outsiders by their peers. 

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  • Adam
    Lv 5
    8 months ago

    Honestly, I feel like this is me. My grandmother on my mother's side was born in Italy. I think that makes me second generation (or third?) Italian.

    I do not speak Italian, nor have the intention to learn. I don't "eat" like an Italian. I don't own anything that is culturally proprietary to Italians, and I just simply consider myself to be American.

    For the most part, almost nobody is "pure American" -- for whatever that means. We all have roots elsewhere.

    I'd just say I never thought it mattered. I never really put any thought into it. I do not go around telling people I'm Italian. I just don't really think about myself like that. I do have an aquiline nose, and a slight olive tint to my skin, but that's about it...

    I honestly thing it goes with fitting in. I myself already struggled with fitting in (I was very shy), so the last thing I wanted was to de-Americanize myself by trying to act or be Italian. That sounds bad, but I was a kid. Not to mention, I simply wasn't raised with Italian culture in mind. I was raised like a normal American kid. 

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    As I’ve gone through this it’s just difficult trying to find your identity since you aren’t fully like your parents but also your different from your peers which is just confusing trying to identify yourself.

  • 8 months ago

    Yes, that is common for 2nd generation immigrants. Their peers have more influnce on them. It's often the 3rd generation that become interested again in learning the grandparents' language and culture. 

    Think about how desperately you wanted to "fit in" as a kid. Think about how you hated it when your parents took you to school because they were "weird". Now multiple that by 10 if your parents speak a different language, dress differently, etc. 

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