Why aren't physicists interested in studying interactions that resulted in creation of life?

It seems that quantum mechanics may be involved.  

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  • 4 weeks ago
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    That is a subject which has been studied for decades, but it's biology & chemistry, not physics.

    The subject name is Abiogenesis.

    Using mixtures of substances and conditions similar to those thought to exist when life originated on earth, experiments have shown that complex molecules such as proteins and amino acids can form spontaneously.

    This is some of the background:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miller%E2%80%93Urey_...

  • 4 weeks ago

    That is chemistry and biology. But it is very interesting. Most physicists are curious.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    As a physicist I follow the principles of Galileo.  Experiment is the key to science.  Once you cannot experiment there is only "pontification".  The very thing that Galileo fought against and was imprisoned for.  ( From pontif.... or the pope and papal decrees of what is right )

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    In collaboration with biochemists they are already studying it..  It is a topic  in the field called 'Quantum Biochemistry'.

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  • Dixon
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    They don't get much quantum physicsier than Schrodinger and he wrote one of the seminal books about biological Life - What is Life?

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