What paperwork needs to be done to run for president?

I just want to know what paperwork needs to be done to be on the ballot. Please

3 Answers

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  • Jeff D
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It varies by state, but most states require an independent candidate to get sufficient number of signatures to appear on the ballot (the exact number varies by state, but it's typically in the range of thousands to tens of thousands of signatures).  Some states also have a filing fee of hundreds to a few thousands of dollars.

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  • 2 months ago

    You need to file in each state. Contact the Secretary of State.

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  • Tmess2
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    That's not an easy question to answer.  

    At the federal level, the key paperwork is controlled by the Federal Election Commission.  You need to file an organization form for your committee, a statement of candidacy, and a monthly report on contributions and expenditures.  The FEC paperwork, however, is merely about campaign finance.  

    The rules for actually getting on the ballot in any given state is determined by that state.  Every state, however, has different rules, and it matters if you are running for nomination as the candidate of an established party (Democratic and Republican in all states; Green, Libertarian, Constitution in specific states), trying to get on the ballot as the nominee of a new party or as an independent, or running as a write-in.   

    Most states require candidates running for the nomination of an established party to file a declaration of candidacy with either a filing fee or a petition signed by a certain number of voters or both.  In a handful of states, while the campaign does not necessarily have to file the paperwork, you will need to have a set of delegate candidates file declarations of candidacy (or you will not be able to win those delegate slots).  At least on the Democratic side (I am not as familiar with the Republican rules), most state parties require the campaign to designate a contact person for any issues that may arise in the delegate selection process.  (For example, one way that the Democratic Party assures that delegates are loyal to a candidate is giving each campaign a limited veto right over delegate candidates.  The Republicans solve this problem by requiring the Secretary of the Convention to record the vote on the first ballot from a state as it was allocated on election day.)  

    After the nominating convention, in most states, it is the state party which officially submits the nominee and the slate of electors rather than the campaign.

    For new parties/independent candidates, the party/candidate will need to submit declarations of candidacy along with petitions to get on the ballot.  Those declarations of candidacy and the petition listing the candidates that the party is running will need to include a slate of electors.  

    In the states that require a write-in candidate to file, the write-in candidate will need to file a declaration of candidate that will need to include a slate of electors.

    The above is a generalization of the required filings and some states may require additional filings.

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