Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 month ago

How did life start or the big bang how is nothing made of something? It just doesn't make sense?

Update:

That sounds kind of silly to say but honestly anything's possible and maybe. I want to know what started everything though and how what started everything was even created. How life was created just doesn't make sense honestly if you're thinking scientifically.

Update 2:

I'm a atheist but at the same time I'm not sure if there is even a "god" I understand saying "god did it" means you have to question where he came from and I question that as well when people say that. 

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  • 1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    The answer to both (unrelated!) questions is that we don't know.   I'm not happy about that, but I'm not so arrogant that I think the universe has to make sense to me!  We know that both life and what we now think of as the universe had a beginning, and there are models, hypotheses and theories that attempt to explain those beginnings - that's probably as good as it gets!

    • Richard
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      this

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  • D g
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The big bang theory is just our way of understanding where time and space as we know it began ....

    You saying something from nothing means you do not understand singularity 

    Singularities are regions of space where the density of matter, or the curvature of spacetime, becomes infinite. In such locales, the standard concepts of space and time cease to have any meaning.

    Singularities are predicted to occur in all black holes and also in certain models of the Universe. For example, open Friedmann models of the Universe possess a singularity in the finite past, while the closed models have both an initial and final singularity. In general, cosmic censorship hides singularities behind event horizons, the exception being the initial singularity of the Big Bang.

    So by this definition we see a singularity is far from nothing 

    Black holes are not nothing at the core there are huge amounts of mass and thus energy

    The other concept that you don't seem to understand is that the singularity of the big bang  is of a universe before ours so the rules that we understand of as science do NOT apply 

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  • 1 month ago

    The Big Bang theory doesn't address creation. It only describes the universe after it is in existence. We don't know how the universe began. There are many ideas. (These aren't developed enough to call them theories.) But we will need a quantum gravity theory to answer the creation question. And even that theory might not answer it.

    But just because we don't understand it, that doesn't make it impossible or supernatural. Further research may give us the answer. I bet it will be very strange and surprising. Or humans might never figure it out. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Both Big Bang & Creationism both believe something came from nothing!

    There are other theories that are better explanations.

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  • 1 month ago

    you are confusing cosmology, abiogenesis, and evolution.

  • Clive
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Learn quantum physics and you will understand it.  Matter CAN pop out of nothing, whether you understand it or not.  Life starting is much easier - it happened by accident when atoms and molecules came together in the right way to be self-reproducing.

    • goring
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      quantum physics does not offer mechanical explanation=Quantum mechanics is probabilistic

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    All right.  Then who created whoever (or whatever) created the universe?  See?  Just because YOU don't understand something doesn't make you "right".   Oh, by the way, the universe is expanding faster than light, even though in the created part of the universe, the top speed IS lightspeed.  Go figure our how THAT is possible.

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    • Jeffrey K
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      Nothing can move thru space faster than light. But space itself can expand at any rate. That doesn't violate relativity. 

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  • 1 month ago

    You are asking totally separate questions in a way that makes others think that they are related.

    1. We do not know the details of how life actually started. However, elements assemble themselves into molecules and compounds in a way that appears to follow rules (in other words, it is not just a "random" assemblage). It is relatively easy to show that once you allow some compounds to form themselves, they tend to form more complex compounds that, themselves, become even more complicated compounds that become those needed for "organic chemistry".

    We also know that "once life does exist", it tends to evolve into organisms that are more and more adapted to the conditions of their environment.

    2. The "Big Bang" is the name of a theory (a proposed explanation) for the behaviour of energy in the universe. It tries to explain how the expansion of space (an observed fact) could act on the energy content of the universe.

    The extremely simplified version goes like this:

    Same amount of energy + more space to spread it out = energy density goes down with time (= the universe cools down with time).

    "Big Bang" is an awful nickname (chosen by an adversary of the theory) that creates the false impression that the theory describes an explosion. There is no explosion in the theory.

    As the universe "cools" (when the energy density goes down), it goes through critical values where things happen. A bit like when you allow liquid water to cool, you reach a critical temperature (0C = 32F) when it turns from liquid to solid and liberates "latent heat".

    Energy does the same thing. There was a time (when the temperature was above 3000 K) when electrons could not remain in orbit around protons: the heat energy would knock them off their orbits. The universe was full of "free charged particles" (protons and neutrons) and photons of light just can't avoid interacting with these charged particles. Light could not travel in such a universe. Then, as temperature dropped below 3000K (because of expanding space), electrons could bind with protons, forming neutral hydrogen... and THAT is transparent. All the light in the universe was suddenly liberated - everywhere and in all directions. This is what formed what we now observe as the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation.

    As we go back in time, we can (eventually) understand what happens at each critical level... except when we go back 13.8 billion years: at that level of energy density, we no longer understand how things work. Worst, we don't even understand how time itself can flow at that level. That moment (called the Planck Era, or Planck Time) is the earliest moment we can analyse. It is, therefore, the "beginning" of the universe we can understand. The universe could be older than that, but we simply do not understand whatever comes "before" (we don't even understand the meaning of the word "before" when we apply it to that moment).

    The Big Bang theory is silent about what comes "before". It only tries to explain what happens once you have something inside a universe where space expands.

    3. "Nothing", when it is studied by experts, turns out to be something quite unstable. It tends to turn itself into something (and the equivalent anti-something) quite easily. Since we cannot analyze large chunks of "nothing" -- because there seems to be "something" just about everywhere -- we do see that small bits of "nothing" spontaneously become small "somethings" (for example, an electron and an anti-electron).

    Nothing = 0

    something + anti-something = 0

    No law is broken.

    On extremely rare occations, we get proton + anti-proton.

    Because these particles are larger, they need a larger chunk of "nothing". Also, these apparitions (quantum fluctuations) are random. The probability of getting something from nothing goes down if you want bigger particles.

    Imagine if you began with an infinite "nothing". The probability of getting a very big something (universe + anti-universe) would be EXTREMELY small... but it would not be exactly zero.

    4. As far as Father Lemaitre was concerned (the priest who developed the model that became the Big Bang theory) the purpose of science is to show HOW God-did-it not WHY. He truly believed that the Big Bang theory was simply a description of how the universe followed the "laws of physics" imposde by [his] god. He used to tell his students (he was a mathematician and a university teacher) that because the Big Bang theory was based on science, it should even work for atheists.

    • neb
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      You should be careful with ‘something’ + ‘anti something’  = 0. Both particles and antiparticles have positive energy so that really isn’t the case. It’s ok for brief violations of energy as long as it is for a small enough amount of time.

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  • 1 month ago

    There was something there

    But it was just squashed into the Singularity is a Grand Black Hole

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  • ANDY
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    The fact is that no one knows what was there before the big bang. Even the big bang itself is a hypothesized answer to how the universe was created. This became "accepted" because the galaxies were noticed to be accelerating "outwards" and not "inwards". So to answer your question would be trying to speculate and find a forced answer to it, and this will keep arising at all times and for a long time too.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    maybe the big bang was a portal from another dimension.

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