If I am doing photography under trees in the shade is that the best time to flick the flash bulb up so the picture comes out better?

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    You can but it depends. Sometimes it's just fine without flash. Check the lightmeter. If shutter speed is below 1/30s, use flash. If the camera is in Auto mode, no worries. It will raise the flash if it think it's needed.

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  • Alan
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    You are asking about synchro-sun (flash under bright sun.

    In deep shade, generally no flash is required because the vista brightness will still be high. We use a weak flash to place a "catch-light" in the eyes. This is a single white spot that gives an illusion of life. We also use flash from a unit held high at arms length away from the camera pointed at the subject. This becomes the main light. It should cast shadows slightly downward. The shadows give an illusion of depth perception. 

    If the sunlight is strong and makes shadows that are too strong, we use the built-in flash or a hand-held placed adjacent to the camera. This flash will fill the shadows preventing them from going black, void of detail. Technically this "fill-flash" should be set to a brightness of 50% (1 f-stop) subordinate to the sunlight exposure. Such a lash-up gives a feeling of depth needed because photography is 2D and the shadows can give the illusion of 3D depth.  

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  • Frank
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If your subject is under a tree, you then run the risk of a few problems.  One is dappled light, which is characterized as spots of shadow and light.  This kind of light should be avoided unless you are certain that the look adds and not distracts from the image.

    Another problem, and this is most pertaining to your question, is that while the subject is in shadow under the tree, the background could be brightly lit by the Sun.  In this case, the contrast in brightness between subject and background is often far too great for even the best of the best cameras.  The resulting image is either a dark subject under the tree and a properly exposed background; or a properly exposed subject in shadow but with a horrendously blown out background.  The solution is to add light to the subject so as to bring up its brightness value closer or equal to that of the background.  Using a flash is a very common way of achieving this look as would the use of a light modifier such as a reflector.  Often both a flash and a light modifier/reflector will be used.

    A typical problem with using fill flash is that the shutter speed can't be any faster than what your camera syncs with the flash.  Often this is 1/60th~1/250th.  The problem you often run into is that you want to use a large aperture to blow out the background, but that means too much light because you're limited to a relatively slow shutter speed.  Say you're at 1/250th at f/4 but to prevent a blown out background, your shutter speed needs to be at 1/2,000th.  Unless you are using high-speed sync flash, you'll need to use a neutral density filter to cut the ambient light down while using a flash at a higher level (compared to not using a ND filter).  This is common practice among videographers who are often fixed at specific and slower shutter speeds.

    You'll want to practice a lot prior to shooting the actual event to ensure you get your camera/exposure settings down.  Read your owner's manual regarding fill flash and manual mode.  Also practice using the camera in manual exposure mode with the flash up.  You may find that the flash isn't powerful enough, the light produces red eye, or the overall look of the on-camera flash isn't what you like - or a combination of these issues.

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    • micksmixxx
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Have another thumbs up from me, Frank.  Sadly, it appears that some numpty ... or should that be person that has absolutely no idea of photography ... is offering thumbs down again.

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  • 1 month ago

    Wow! Check out this idiot's questions!

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  • 1 month ago

    Experiment.  Take the same shot with and without flash.  Adjust shutter speeds. Make notes of the settings.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Take some both ways, which one turns out better?  Some pictures may look better with the backflash, others may not.

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