Why can't you start a sentence with "and"?

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  • 1 month ago

    Because 'and' is a conjunction, in other words a word that joins two words together, like 'bread and butter'.

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  • 1 month ago

    Tuck, do what you want, man. "And" at the beginning of sentences is fine if you want it to be. People who will correct you for that have so little going on that they need you to do it to keep them alive...unless this is for a paper. Then you don't want to because technically a conjunction connects two different phrases on either side of it. Otherwise, do you. 

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  • goring
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    And would be like saying" et Puis or alors"  in french meaning like saying "so then. with would imply" in addition.

    In a language there are many ways to make a point.

     Lawyers would Say " And furthermore ....."

    • Spurgeon1 month agoReport

      You can start a sentence with anything except 1, 2; 3' but if you do use words not figures. 

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  • 1 month ago

    because grammar nazis here will jump in your ****

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  • ML
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    You can use "and" in the beginning of the sentence, except exams like SAT, TOEFL and other tests according  very strict rules of grammatically correct language.

  • If you are reading a novel or poems, sometimes it starts with and  'And there she was sitting...'

    Grammatically you can't, there should be a word before 'and'

    similar to the word 'but'

    Example

    That and this or this, that and those

    Nice but too costly

    Hope it helps

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  • 1 month ago

    'And' is a conjunction, which connects two phrases, or ideas, within a sentence.  There is nothing to 'connect' when we begin a sentence with 'And.'   When writers begin sentences with 'and,' most notably poets, they are exercising what we call  'poetic license,' which is an artistic way of playing with the rules of grammar for effect.

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  • 1 month ago

    You can, because I am noticing it happening more and more these days.  However, it is not technically correct, since the word 'and' is a conjunction, and as such, it JOINS - usually two phrases or thoughts or intentions etc.  Therefore, it hardly seems applicable at the very beginning of the sentence, since it will be joining something from the previous sentence and consequently, should not have been dislocated or separated from that in the first place.

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  • 1 month ago

    And who ever said that you couldn't.

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  • 1 month ago

    Sure you can!  And I can do it too.  But you're not supposed to.  Like so many rules, it's one of those rules that's just a rule because everyone agrees it is.

    Have you ever heard 'rules are made to be broken'?  This is just the kind of rule that old saying is talking about.  Once you understand why it's there, you can break it if you think that would work better. 

    Just like, you know, when you take a picture they tell you not to have the sun in the frame, in fact to shade your lens from the sun.  Which is a good rule generally.  But once you learn why that is, what the sun does to a picture, you might decide to use that effect deliberately.  And that's perfectly okay.

    • Rules arnt meant to be broken, that's the point, but you choose to break if wish be

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