Do I need a humidifier or a dehumidifier for a house that has thick, dry air?

A humidifier will put moisture in the air but it'll make the air thicker and a dehumidifier will take moisture out but make the air dry. The house has poor ventilation and we suffer from nosebleeds and dry throats.

12 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    What you need to do is get a humidistat. Find out the relative humidity in the home. The most comfortable range is about 45 to 48%. If your relative humidity is lower, use a humidifier only in cold months. In warm weather, if the relative humidity is over 80% use a dehumidifier. If your home is equipped with a gas furnace and gas ducts, you can look into adding an "air to air" heat exchanger.. It brings in outside air, transfers heat from inside air and pushes out inside air.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Let's all get out our dictionaries (or Merriam.com).  To humidify would be to add humidity; aka moisture back in to your surroundings.  No need to "De"-humidify an already dry environment when there is no moisture to remove.  Was this a trick question?

    On a serious note, get a floor fan to keep the air moving. It couldn't hurt to always keep a window open about an inch as soon as temps go in to the 50; more if warmer.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    You should get a humidifier.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Nosebleeds and dry throats = Humidifier. The air’s too dry. Whenever I put my heater on while I sleep, I’ll sometimes wake up from a nosebleed the next morning, or even in the middle of the night 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Thick air?                                

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    It sounds like you have dry air and need a humidifier, but I'd be very hesitant to use one in a home with poor ventilation.   That's a recipe for mold.

    If you own the home, talk to an HVAC person.  A ductless heat pump system may be just what you need.  It will control humidity, heat your home very efficiently and you'll have very, very inexpensive AC in the summer.   I think I paid about 4k for my system all said and done, plus I got a $1500 rebate from the electricity company.    Best home improvement dollars ever spent.

    It's so sad to live in a home that is uncomfortable.   It's your HOME...the place you are supposed to love and feel safe in. 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Nosebleeds and dry throats mean you need moisture in the air so a humidifier

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • martin
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It would seem a dehumidifier is what you need because the dry air is breaking the capillaries and causing nose bleeds and other symptoms of dryness.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Eva
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You need a humidifier. Nosebleeds are from dry tissues and the dry throats are self explanatory. A house can't have thick, dry air. Thick air comes from excess humidity.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Murzy
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Humidifier adds "moisture" to your house.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.