Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationMaintenance & Repairs · 1 month ago

Would you avoid cars with this feature?

I am looking to buy a used Honda but I am avoiding models with a timing belt since they can break. Most sellers don't even know when they replaced them and they cost $1000.

23 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago

    You need to avoid buying cars that are electric.  A study has already proven that, in the long run (and life of a vehicle), fuel combustion cars are cheaper to operate then electric vehicles.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Get a car without a timing belt.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    I wouldn't necessarily rule out vehicles with timing belts.  You can always have them inspected to determine if they have (or need to be) replaced.

    Worn/cracked timing belts are pretty easy to spot - or you can just do it at 100K miles as a preventative measure.

    It's generally not hard to change a timing belt (tensioner and water pump should be replaced at the same time) - the only problem is that many of them are up against the inside of the engine compartment, making it difficult to remove the cover.

    • Anon
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      Not on Chrysler V6, behind a hard to get off cover. PS, everything, must come off. May as well replace water pump at same time.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    You don't have to worry about the unknowns if you do this. 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • 1 month ago

    Corollas from 1998 on have timing chains. Civics from 2006 on have timing chains. Not all cars' timing belts cost $1000 to replace, but repairing the car after timing belt failure, in some cars, can cost over $1000. You avoid that by keeping up with maintenance.

    • ...Show all comments
    • Edna
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      The timing belt on my car broke, and the car came to a dead stop. My mechanic charged a little over $100 to replace the timing belt (plus the cost of his wrecker towing my car to his shop). 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    First off, the vast majority of car made in the last decade have timing belts. Second off, a timing belt change costs about $250, not $1000.

    • ...Show all comments
    • Dan
      Lv 5
      1 month agoReport

      @Road warrior - READ this answer carefully - "in the last decade" that's what I was commenting on, not the poster's question. OBVIOUSLY you didn't know that t
      he vast majority of cars made in the last decade do not have timing belts.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    To each there own.

    Just make sure you change the oil and filter every 3,000 mile or every 5,000 miles if using synthetic oil.

    It's very important to check the oil level on the dipstick once a month and to keep the oil level topped up.

    The timing chain and cam advance actuators will go bad if you don't follow these easy things to do.

    Source(s): Mitsubishi Master Tech
    • F
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      Oil changes / correct oil is more crucial with chains than belts.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    We buy used and that has never caused us to avoid a particular model. It is a consideration but we factor in that replacement cost in the purchase price if the mileage indicates changing the belt is due soon or overdue. If they come down, then we just get the belt replaced ASAP. If they won't come down, we walk away. Usually they come down a bit when the need for the repair is explained.  In the case of our current second car, a 2009 Acura MDX, the price had already been lowered because of major services due soon the owner knew about but didn't want to have done himself. We bought from a reliable dealer we've dealt with before and he actually had a list of what was due when we went to test drive it.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    One of the reasons I've been buying Fords for some years is that nearly all use timing chains.  Now they aren't gonna make any cars any more (just trucks) so will have to find another make.  I had to replace belts on 2 cars in the past - and I'm not paying for that again !!!

    • ...Show all comments
    • Name Withheld
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      I consider "big SUVs" to be trucks, not cars....in the cases you site they are developed from pick-up trucks.  Well known that the last CAR Ford is going to sell in the US is the Mustang  (at least according to FoMoCo - and I assume that they know).  

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Buying a used car =  anything  can break at  anytime.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.