Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 month ago

NASA pictures of earth doesn't seems oblate Spheroid. But I don't like conspiracy theories..so it must be a risnable explanation what is he?

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  • 1 month ago

    Just because you can't see irregularities in the shape doesn't mean they're not there.

    It's not perfectly round.

    • i have huge biceps and an amazing 6pac but just because girls can't see them doesn't mean they're not there.  same thing lol

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  • D g
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    There is a way to visualize this ..

    Draw a perfect circle 10 cm in diameter then put a bulge the width of the pencil circle and erase the inner circle mark then ask someone to visually tell if there is a bulge 

    Did you notice the math that it was about 70 km different from center to North  so unless you have great eyesight you won't see it bulging 

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  • 1 month ago

    Sorry, but I never believe in risnable explanations.

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  • 1 month ago

    Earth is an oblate spheroid.

    Diameter through the poles: 12,714 kilometers

    Diameter through the equator: 12,756 kilometers

    That's a difference of only 42 kilometers out of more than 12,700 kilometers.

    Percentage-wise that's a difference of (at most) 37 one-hundredths of 1 percent.  Not enough of a difference for the naked eye to detect.

    • definitely the best answer to the question so far.

      perhaps the one below might better this, but this will take some beating.

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  • 1 month ago

    The Oblateness is not that Clear to the Normal Eye

    But the Circumference around Both poles is a few percent less than that around the Equator

    Which is a Menagerie Lion running around the Centre of the Earth at 0 Degrees Latitude

    Playing the Accordion

    Attachment image
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  • 1 month ago

    Earth's about 20 miles thicker through the equator than through the poles.  Earth's diameter is about 8000 miles, so it's about 0.25% thicker through the equator.... to put that into perspective, if you had an image of the Earth that was 8000 pixels across, it would be 20 pixels wider than tall - which isn't very much, and difficult to see. 

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  • 1 month ago

    you can't tell the difference on the scale of a photo. We lack the ability to define differences on the order of parts per thousand at the scale of less than a meter (we can't see sub-millimeter differences with our eyes, basically, and that is the proportional difference between the long and short axis of the spheroid, on the order of a part per mil. Basically the width of a hair on a typical page-sized photo is the difference in radius between equator and pole.  You have much better vision than most if you can see that.

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  • 1 month ago

    NASA pictures of earth look like a sphere, because the earth is ALMOST a sphere. The equatorial radius of the earth is only 10 miles longer than the polar radius. Naked eye is not going to notice that difference, when both radii are close to 4000 miles.

    One way it becomes noticeable is that gravitation at sea level near the equator is about half a percent greater than at the poles.

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  • 1 month ago

    The difference in diameter pole to pole compared to across the equator is about 0.3%. It's unlikely you'd be able to perceive it.

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It's not VERY oblate.  Of course you wouldn't notice it on a photo.  Just like you wouldn't notice your house on a photo of the whole Earth - it's too small to see.

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