Sarah asked in Society & CultureRoyalty · 2 months ago

Can there be a Duchess of Cambridge and a Countess of Cambridge at the same time?

10 Answers

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  • Rico
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Typically in The UK, an Earldom and Dukedom of the same territorial designation can only exist at the same time when the former has been elevated. 

    One such example of this happening was when Queen Victoria elevated the Earldom of Fife to a Dukedom in 1889, after the marriage of her granddaughter Princess  Louise of Wales to Alexander Duff.  Consequently they were Earl & Countess and Duke & Duchess of Fife simultaneously. Victoria later amended the succession rules for the Dukedom (In1900) to enable it to be inherited by her great grand daughter in the absence of a male heir.  The earldom became extinct on Alexander’s  death in 1912. 

    Princess Louise could have chosen to style herself as Dowager Countess of Fife if she wanted to, n order to distinguish herself from her daughter Alexandra, The Suo jure Duchess of Fife 

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  • 2 months ago

    There could be, there are some titles that are kind of like that.

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  • 2 months ago

    Chelsy, Countess of Sussex. Yas queen! I'd like to see video of THAT royal engagement. Markle taking off her giant stilettos and hoop earrings as Chelsy enters Westminster...... Big Ben chiming the start of Round 1. Ding ding ding!

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  • Edna
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No . there can't be a Duchess of Cambridge and a Countess of Cambridge at the same time. A Duchess of Cambridge is the wife of a Duke of Cambridge. A Countess is the wife of an Earl. There is not an Earl of Cambridge. 

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  • No. Traditionally a new peerage does not take the same name as an existing one unless it is to promote the holder of the existing one. So, for example, Henry Cecil, the 10th Earl of Exeter was created the 1st Marquess of Exeter. At this point, the line for the Earls of Exeter ceased. It is not even used as a courtesy title by the Marquess's son, who instead uses the lower title of Baron Burghley. 

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  • Clo
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No, the two titles can not coexist. The Cambridge title is associated only with the royal family.

    The title Earl of Cambridge did exist--the feminine title being Countess of Cambridge:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Cambridge

    In 1664, the title ceased to exist, being superseded by the Dukedom of Cambridge.

    Also of note:

    There are two types of  British peerage titles. One is royal, which is higher in precedence than the non-royal aristocratic one. A prince may be made a royal duke, marquess, earl, viscount, and/or baron. Royals usually bear titles specifically held for the royals.

    Currently, the closest thing to a non-royal Cambridge title is held by the Duke of Hamilton  holds the title Earl of Arran and Cambridge in the Peerage of Scotland, which is not related to the British earldom.

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  • 2 months ago

    I doubt it....

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It varies in different countries, principalities, etc. . . but in most a Count/Countess is a member of the nobility but not Royalty . . . and a Duke/Duchess is a member of the Royalty.

    Marriage to a member of the Royalty raises you from the nobility . . . so a Countess would become a Duchess upon marriage to a Duke, but if they divorce she would return to being a Countess unless the monarch orders differently.

    I think, lol.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes and the ensuing catfight would be hilarious.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes, but not at the moment. There is currently no Earldom of Cambridge.

    In theory there can be, as they are different things, but historically most of the holders of either the Dukedom or Earldom have died without marrying, so the situation as far as I can recall has not arisen.

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