Does planned obsolescence more often apply to city buses or subway cars?

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    whenever I'm having a bad day I always think "Things could be a lot worse. I could be Ben."  

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Reported again.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You are the most pathetic loser on this website. Of all the things there are in this world to obsess over, you choose to fixate on vehicle model numbers and celebrity's names. What a waste of an existence. 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I wish it applied to your stupid questions.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    read the sign folks..

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  • 2 months ago

    Neither really.

    City buses and subway cars tend to be purchased based on their ability to be reliable, repairable, and are only replaced once they have served out their intended lifespan.

    'Planned obsolescence' only really comes into play with consumer grade electronics - most of which are not intended to be repaired (or even repairable), and which will tend to fail at (or very soon after) their warranty runs out.

    Even then, some people find ways of fixing and/or extending the life of various devices - and there are flukes that continue to work far beyond their intended lifespan (of course, there are also cases like iPhones where Apple was found to be purposefully slowing down older phones).

    People tend to not really care about the planned obsolescence model, as they have become used to simply replacing their electronic devices on fairly regular schedule with the newest ones (some people absolutely 'must' have the newest ones).

    For some it's just bragging rights and/or keeping up appearances, but while the newest devices often have features that older ones do not, they also often have bugs that haven't been worked out yet.

    I tend to operate from a 'if it ain't broke, don't replace it' mentality - but even when I do upgrade, I will generally go one model back from the 'bleeding edge' technology - and I'm rarely disappointed.

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