Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 2 months ago

I have been told that gravity pulled pieces of rocks together in outer space to form the earth.I thought there wasn't any gravity there.?

18 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago

    Gravity is everywhere, Even Atoms have Gravity to hold them together

     It is such a bond that to force them apart causes Nuclear explosions and Supernova

     But it does get weaker the further particles are away

    Atoms would clump together, ( Higgs Boson ) and all that

    to become a speck of dust

    Then Pebbles, then Rocks

    When a body reaches around 500 Kilometers across it goes through Hydrostatic Equalibrium, ( Becomes a Globe )

    Hence Proto Planet

    After the Sun had ignited and blew all the dust and ice out to the farther reaches of the Solar System it was estimated there were at least 200 of these Proto Planets orbiting in the Inner Solar System

    Collisions were inevitable so planets became bigger

    One of the most important things was the Mars sized Proto Planet Theia that hit the fledgling Earth

    It created our Moon

    Imagine if it had hit Mars instead

     The Last Great Bombardment happened about 3.8 Billion years ago

     Coinciding with the beginning of life on Earth

     The Alpha Centauri System had come as close as 3.8 Light Years of our Solar System

    Enough to perturb the Oort cloud, sending in Comets towards the Sun and supplying water

    Everything happens for a reason and it is all Nature

    Attachment image
    Source(s): Thiea
    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Looks like you were mistaken.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    To put it simply...gravity is everywhere.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    So many people have that false belief. Of course there is gravity in space. All matter attracts all other matter. Rocks in space have a little gravity but enough to attract other rocks. That is how all planets formed. 

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Local gravity isn't really a major factor in collisions of random objects in space.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • 2 months ago

    All mass has gravity - you do, the Earth does, so does the pencil on your desk... As mass collects, the more gravity there is from that mass, and draws in more mass. 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Gravity's reach is infinite. Objects in free fall, such as orbiting objects, are only affected very slightly by gravity. The fact that the Universe is closed rather than infinite is the result of gravitational pull warping space. Even the furthest star influences us gravitationally.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    If there is mass, then there is gravity.

    Not to be confused with weight. Weight is the force you feel, pushing back up against the bottom of your feet, to keep you from accelerating towards the centre of Earth (under the pull of gravity).

    Satellites around Earth (the ISS, for example) certainly feel Earth's gravity, otherwise they gently float away from Earth. What keeps the ISS from falling to the ground is its sideways speed - it moves sideways fast enough that Earth's surface curves away and the ISS keeps "missing" it.

    The astronauts inside the ISS are also subect to this pull of gravity and they fall towards Earth, sharing the sideways speed of the ISS. Therefore, they do not feel any push from the "floor" of the ISS (or from any walls, or ceiling or whatever else). They have no weight. They are still subject to gravity... and there is plenty of that.

    Even on Earth, if you were inside an elevator (one without the security system invented by Mr. Otis) and the cable broke, both you and the elevator would fall towards the centre of Earth under the pull of gravity.  Because the floor of the elevator is falling down as fast as you are, it is no longer pushing back on your feet: you'd feel weightless.

    However, your increasing speed (relative to the floor of the basement) would be proof that gravity still acts on you.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    And there was me thinking that you must be an expert on empty spaces 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    You thought wrong.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It's in the rocks themselves. Every bit of matter has some gravitational force.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.