Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthMental Health · 2 months ago

Anyone 50 years or older, how do you handle depression?

I'm not clinically diagnosed with depression because I have not seen a psychologist. I don't know if it's depression or not but I'm always low that I have thoughts on suicide. I don't want to do it for the sake of my family but I'm always suffering mentally. 

The reason why I'm asking people who are older is because I want to know your guys' coping mechanism to deal with mental pain and make it this far to an older age, although younger people are welcome to answer too.

Have you tried the suicide hotline? Is like therapy? Because I saw two therapists to talk about my problem but it doesn't seem to help.

If it comes down to it, I plan to end my life by donating all my organs so as to not waste it and save other people's lives.

15 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago

    Exercise!!! It's amazing for depression. Do anything... walk, run, bike, jump rope. Get your heart pumping. Find a great bike or walking trail in a nearby park in the fresh air and sunshine. Exercise produces positive chemical changes in your body. It's healthy and natural and can really help clear your mind. Do consult a professional as well. Sometimes the altered body chemistry needs something stronger. The worst thing? Doing nothing as it will change nothing and you'll not move off the spot in which you currently find yourself. Good luck! 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Try not to be a boomer like everyone else

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Well I am almost 65 my life has been a total sh it 

    show With only a few brief pleasurable interludes.. I have nothing anymore. It was basically all taken from me. But I refuse to commit suicide. I believe in karma and reincarnation and I once heard this theory that if you commit suicide, in your next life you have to come back and redo all the things you did in the previous life. Go through all the suffering again. I just don’t want to go through it again. So I’ll stay around and suffer until I die. The only times in my life I really actively tried to commit suicide was was when I was on psychiatric drugs. That’s because they have that as a side effect. They don’t tell you that of course.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    You may not be clinically diagnosed with depression, but you're definitely depressed. However--you need to get a physical assessment FIRST. If you're over 50, you may be taking medications that have this side effect.  Have a doctor give you a thorough medical exam, including all the medications you may be taking. Then let him know you feel suicidal. 

    Suicide hotlines can help, and therapy can also help--but you have to give them a chance--I don't know how long you tried therapy, but maybe it wasn't long enough. Your medical doctor is your first step here--get checked out completely. Many chronic illnesses can cause depression. 

    Once you get a medical clearance, there is no one solution for feeling depressed. Anti-depressant medication helps in a lot of cases--it can be a crap-shoot though. Some take weeks to work, some don't work at all, some have other side effects you won't like--and some actually help. That will be something your doctor can assist you with. And it may be a long journey. So be prepared.

    One of the biggest reasons for people over 50 who experience depression is loneliness, and a feeling of isolation. Are you keeping up with a social circle, even through this pandemic? Talking to people? Getting involved in group activities?  Do you have hobbies or interests that are something you can fall back on when friends are not around? Do you have family or any support system at all? These things keep people alive; what have you done to build a network?  

    you can also stop comparing your life to everyone else's life. No two people have the same set of circumstances or reasons for being here--and you simply can't let other people's situations tell you what yours should be. I know that may be easier said than done--but it's essential to finding some peace and happiness, especially now. No matter WHAT you have, someone else will always have more, or less, than you. It's a futile exercise to think you should be like other people, or that your life should be the same. 

    I wish you luck and good fortune in this--it can be difficult, but coming out on the other side is worth it, if you want to be there. 

    Source(s): I've been there--and I'm 68.
    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • Chanel
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    Remember that age is just a number cos young people have it all to come.

    What goes up and never goes down? Age.

    I remember an elderly lady telling me you get all kinds of things wrong with your health when you get older and she was so right.

    Therapists are trial and error. I've had some in the past who were no help but I have had good ones. So don't give up cos you will meet a therapist that you click with.

    Don't feel sad cos we are all going the same way and we are all suffering with this lock down. It is harder for people who have children and the amount of calls to the police for domestic violence related incidents has soared since lock down.

    Maybe your doctor could give you some medication. But don't give up. I feel for you cos my mother was depressed a lot but never treated for it cos it was a stigma in those days but is it not now.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    I am over 60 (and don't consider myself old yet) and I find volunteer work helps.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Liz
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    As a practicing Christian, I keep focused on the Bible's message of hope for a better way of life in the very near future.

    6 What blessings will God’s Kingdom bring for mankind? The things that the Kingdom will soon accomplish include:

    (1) Wars, crime, and violence will be eliminated forever.—Psalm 46:8, 9; Isaiah 2:4.

    (2) Equality and impartiality will exist for all; there will be no more racial, social, or other forms of discrimination.—Acts 10:35; Revelation 7:9, 10.

    (3) There will be abundant food, adequate housing, and enjoyable work for everyone.—Psalm 72:16; Isaiah 25:6; 65:21, 22.

    (4) Sickness, disability, old age, and death will be no more.—Isaiah 25:8; 35:5, 6; Revelation 21:4.

    (5) The dead will be raised.—John 5:28, 29; Revelation 20:12.

    (6) The earth will become a global paradise.—Luke 23:43; Psalm 98:7-9.

    Source(s): jw.org
    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    One way to handle depression is GET OVER IT.

    I have done it myself by strength of will alone.

    You have to Want to beat it, of course.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • keerok
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Suicide hotlines put you on-hold.

    Therapy is a one-on-one session with your psych.

    Psychs also prescribe meds. You may need some.

    Family and friends are the most important support system you can rely on. Don't be ashamed or scared to ask help from them.

    In the end, suicide passes on your problems to your loved-ones. It doesn't solve anything.

    Try all possible solutions. It's not a one-shot deal. It takes time and to some, it's a life-long struggle.

    How does one 50+ year old handle depression? Focus on supporting your family and watch lots of Korean telenovelas. They have much graver problems there than yours.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Bob
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    I'm a good way over 50. Personally, I am very good at compartmentalising. If there is something that causes me unhappiness to think about, I put the thought in a drawer in my mind and close the drawer. I just don't think about it. I appreciate that not everyone can do this effectively. Depression sucks and I hope you find your way through it.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.