Workplace scheduling laws?

I’ve been laid off from my office for sometime now, and I return today. When I got to work my badge wouldn’t let me through security, so I called the security desk and they let me in. When I went to my workplace I texted my manager, because she wouldn’t answer the call, and informed her that no one was there... I sat there for 45 minutes after my shift was supposed to start, and informed her I was going home. The question I have is would I be liable for leaving? I mean I sat at the office for a full 45 minutes that I could have been paid, not to mention the 45 minute drive. Are there any sort of laws protecting me from this kind of issue?

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  • 1 month ago

    You were there, you get paid.  Period.  Should have stayed and kept getting paid.

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  • 1 month ago

    In the US, there are NO laws about scheduling except in 'safety' related jobs where you are limited in how many hours you can work.

    Without any of the details you didn't include, it is likely you are legally required to be paid for the 45 minutes you were actually in the office. Your commute is irrelevant.

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  • 1 month ago

    When you got to your work statio, why did you not start working? If you were locked out of the system, or technically not "punched in" all that can be fixed later. The Fact is that abandoned your shift. by leaving on your own without a manager sending you home, You screwed yourself out of any leg to stand on. If they want to, they can now take you off payroll and you will get Nothing!

    The last thing in the world you should have done was to take it upon yourself to Leave.

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  • 1 month ago

    Where I live, employees are entitled to a 3 hour minimum shift which means if you weren't called off before you arrived, you're owed 3 hours, even if they send you home for whatever reason (unless they have a legitimate reason to do so such as behaviour violating the company policy).

    You would have to look up the laws where you live since they vary drastically.

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    • StarShine
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      https://www.fasken.com/en/knowledge/2018/03/bill-148-update-scheduling-and-the-three-hour-rule/

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Laws depend on country, which you fail to say

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