I am 55 years old and planning to go back in college to take a 4 years course. Am I too late to go back to study a 4 year course?

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes, I am sure admissions for the year are closed at present...

    • Rylan1 month agoReport

      Not for all schools, I’m mid-registration for fall semester courses at Pensacola State College.

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  • Paul
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It is never too late. Go for it!

    • PD4 weeks agoReport

      If you can afford it, go ahead. Never to late.  

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  • 1 month ago

    absolutely right time 

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  • Dave
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It was almost 50 years ago, for me, when I was  a mere "teaching assistant" in a beginning course in college, teaching for the first time at that level. A 70-plus year old man registered in my course. He said only, "I want to sit in the first row so I have no trouble hearing what you say." I said, "no problem," or the equivalent, because we were all more polite back then...  ("you're welcome to do that..." -- perhaps... ) .  (So, you, at 55, don't forget to speak up for yourself -- you're paying this university, through your teachers, to communicate well with you...) He had a good time there; I had a good time there; the class had a good time WITH him in the class, sitting there in the first row.  Things were taught and things were learned. He didn't ask many questions, but they were intelligent ones. In fact, HE taught me to slow down and to be clearer (because they should be...) and so two things were gained -- him learning the subject matter, and me learning how to teach better -- and I learned learners, no matter what age, want to learn when they say they do. I don't know whether he was just into learning this subject alone, or whether he was going to go on for more, including a 4-year. ... But it really didn't matter, as I slowly learned that semester to realize about him.  (The rest of the class was *way* ahead of me on that, with regards to him...  ). So as many have said above, it's never too late for YOU to do what you need/want to do. It won't always be a cakewalk at 55.  It can be done, however... 

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  • 1 month ago

    No. I am over 70 and currently studying for a Masters degree. I started my first degree at 38, my second at 66 and am now into my third. All part time rather than full time but I've enjoyed every moment. You will also find that the young students will accept you as a fellow student and enjoy your company.

    • Chester1 month agoReport

      wow ! I can feel how happy you are with your fellow student. Stay safe .

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  • 1 month ago

    no way! my mom studied multiple things in college and had many different jobs. she was so talented! but she got diagnosed with really bad mental illnesses so no university or workplace wants her. what a waste of talent, shes too cool to be just a housewife :( 

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  • 1 month ago

    It's never too late to go back to school if you want to. But check this out: you may be eligible to take the courses you want for FREE. Many universities have 'auditing' programs for senior citizens where you can simply sit in the class and take the exams but not have to pay tuition. You should check out your chosen schools programs for seniors. 

    Also consider that when you graduate you will be 59 years old--and a lot of employers will not hire you at that age, since it would only be from 3-5 years to retirement. That's not a gamble a lot of employers are willing to take for a new hire. If you are currently employed and want to improve your chances for promotion or a salary hike, and you think the degree would help gain that, then go for it--just remember how much a 4-year program costs and weigh it against what you are actually going to GET out of it when you complete it. When you look at it like that, auditing classes for free might be a better solution. You owe nothing, and you still gain the knowledge, though not the diploma or degree (or credits). But it's FREE. 

    You should be planning your retirement and what you are going to be doing next--if that includes school, great. If it seems like it wouldn't gain you much or increase your retirement income, then you should re-think this plan. But if you just want to do it to DO it, then absolutely go for it.  

    Source(s): Worked in HR for 31 years
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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I went to college at 50 and enjoyed every moment of it.

    Loved it so much that I never missed a day.

    Hope you will too... Good luck!

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    What you should consider is not just going back, but the amount of time you will have to be able to practice what you learn in the real world too.

    Frankly I think it's better to go to college at a much younger age, but you can do whatever you want.

    I graduated from college when I was 21 years old, and now I am in my thirties.

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  • DON W
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Professors generally enjoy having older students in their classes.  They tend to be well behaved, do their work on time, and offer useful insights to class discussions.

    You'll also get more respect from college administrators.  

    About the only drawback is that you are too old to live in the dorms (unless the college has adult student housing--some do), to get involved in student activities such as fraternities, or to be on intercollegiate sports teams.  You might also have some trouble getting friendly with the younger students outside of classes, but you probably won't be bothered much by that.

    The most important thing you can do is to turn your intention into specific action.  Start looking at colleges and programs and see what you need to do to apply and then do so.  A lot of people never get beyond "planning to".

    • Good answer, wonder why you got a td.  We rented a place nearby.

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