Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureRoyalty · 1 month ago

In today’s media culture, would the UK monarchy survive if it were headed by a monarch who has very meagre public support?

What would be done by the palace and the government to stabilise the monarchy if there was a monarch on the throne who had far less than 50% support from the public and who was outwardly disliked by a majority of the public?

NOTE: Comparing a previous reign when there was an unpopular monarch to the reign of a future unpopular monarch is not valid. Previous unpopular monarchs did not have the same level of intense media scrutiny that today’s media culture ensures. Also, previous monarchs lived in times when there was much greater deference, in general, given to the monarch and the monarchy. That same deference no longer exists (a fact, whether one likes it or not). 

Update:

Some deference still exists, but not anywhere near the level of deference provided in the past. 

Update 2:

Some have answered this question by insinuating that the media (aka “the press”) doesn’t make the decisions about the stability of the monarchy.  Let me say that it’s not the media itself, per se, it’s the INFLUENCE that the modern media culture has on the public. It’s the public who have to support the monarchy for it to stay in its exalted place, and today’s media culture puts the monarch and the monarchy under a microscope for public scrutiny like never before.

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    My estimate is that the monarchy would be in serious trouble if fell below about 40% support. That would be low enough to trigger a real movement to remove them.

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  • 1 month ago

    The monarchy cannot survive without the majority of the public supporting it. That seems like a no-brainer. So, an unpopular monarch would tear away at that public support. It would all depend on how long the unpopular monarch reigns and how badly s/he is disliked, in regard to how much erosion of public support would be generated to bring down the institution. I see the institution as already being fragile because it is blatantly anachronistic. 

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  • Clo
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The constitution, the law, not the media culture determines who is the monarch.

    In today's media culture, monarchy still exists.

    Now, if the media did determine who was monarch, what form the government would take, then there would be an issue, only of these polls were proven to be accurate. Polls are not trustworthy. They can be massaged to fit an agenda.

    The majority of today's polls are not scientifically carried out, which means that there is proof that everyone is asked the exactly the same questions, word for word, and the responder's biases are noted. The biases of the people carrying out the poll are also duly noted.

    • ?1 month agoReport

      Yet again, you express your Trumpian American view of polling. According to you and your president, if the polling doesn’t suit your agenda, it’s all the polling’s fault. You must come up with a much better argument if you want to be taken seriously. 

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  • Charles' popularity is only about 37% but, that makes no difference to the institution of Monarchy. It will survive the peoples indifference to him.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    It is currently headed by a monarch who enjoys unprecedented support. Most people are not going to worry about something that happened last century. Charles has had his crisis moment and anyone who matters got past that long ago. The media doesn't seem able to topple an unelected government aide, so they are not going to get far with the legal heir to the throne.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Being royal is not a popularity contest, nor is it one that is one that is run by what the press says. There is no point in comparing it to other monarchs. I would of thought that the people would just get on with their lives. We have a very good form of government where the democratically government is elected by the people and the Royalty are hereditary and don't interfere with the government, and this has worked well for a very long time now.

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  • 1 month ago

    I'd suggest that 'support from the public' isn't relevant.   Media culture or not.   We in the UK have an elected government and an hereditary monarchy which has worked for how-many years (since the Cromwell experiment, which didn't work).  People just get on with their lives - whether or not individual Monarchs are 'popular'.   Frankly if it ain't broke, don't fix it!!   And the current system in the UK 'ain't broke'!!!

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