What sort of photography can I use a a bridge camera for?

I understand they won't be good for nature or wildlife photography because the telephoto zoom is slow

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    You work with what you have and use everything you know to make it happen. 

    If the camera is slow, shoot under lots of light only. Since that can't be said with most wildlife shots, you will have to get near, hide, and stay still for very long to get decent shots. For nature, it should do fine as long as action isn't involved. It's the same thing with sports. Pick your shots, preferring those on deadball situations. Bridge cameras were made as all-purpose cameras. They allow more zoom and a bit more features than your regular point-and-shoot cameras. Bridge cameras are supposedly fun to use. You don't think much about settings. they're no for serious photographers. With them, you just shoot and shoot.

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  • Sumi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Social events, landscapes, anything that is small and not close such as small birds and other small animals. along with pretty much anything that is far, far away.  These are just some of the types of photos you can make with a bridge camera.  Go to 500px.com and do a keyword search for various models of bridge cameras to see what other have done with their cameras.

    You wouldn't want to use it for sports/fast action, not because the zoom is slow, but because the auto focusing system is far too slow and inaccurate for fast action, and the lag between the time you press the shutter button and the camera actually makes the exposure is very long relatively speaking.  But you could use it to take photos of players not moving quickly such as when a batter is at the plate.

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  • qrk
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You can use it for whatever you want.

    I have DSLRs that I use for shots that I care about. I also have a pocket camera for those times when I don't have my DSLR.

    My pocket camera, with a 1" sensor and 3x zoom (a step up from a bridge camera with a 1/2.3" sensor), is with me most of the time. I've taken pictures of birds, snakes, other nearby wildlife, fishing trips with lots of landscape to behold, and family outings. Sometimes I go on trips and leave the DSLR at home because the pocket camera will work just fine for my needs (not expecting any spectacular shots).

    While having a fast lens for wildlife shots is helpful, it isn't always needed. Part of wildlife photography is stalking your prey. If you play a waiting game and situate yourself properly, you can get the wildlife to come to you. Heck, I had a small herd of caribou walk within 3 metres of me.

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  • 1 month ago

    A keen birdwatching friend of mine uses a bridge camera all the time - he's never going to be published in National Geographic, but his pictures are easily good enough for his needs.  I've used a bridge camera for all sorts of things from landscape to sports (outdoor tennis) and got some decent shots.  

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You don't always need a fast or long lens to photograph nature. There is a zoologist who uses a wide angle lens to shoot reptiles and include a lot of the surroundings in his photos. I used a 24mm Sigma lens with close focusing to film a treefrog perched on a leaf and its surrounding woodland. The trick is to know where your subjects are and how they behave. I once walked slowly right up to a hummingbird perched on a fence. I got so close with a macro lens that I got a picture of a hummingbird that had a facial expression of utter surprise.

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