How come people think space is a vacuum?

If space really was a vacuum then how come theres space dust? If it was a vacuum then it would be clean. No dust.

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  • 1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    (Sigh) Have you looked inside you vacuum at home? A lot of dust there, even when on. Space is a vacuum, not vacuumed.

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  • 1 month ago

    Space is not a perfect vacuum. There are many atoms and particles and other stuff floating around. But is a much better vacuum than anything we can make on Earth. 

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  • 1 month ago

    The vacuum is between your ears.Hoover or Kirby?

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  • 1 month ago

    A vacuum is not a vacuum cleaner.

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  • There is some gas even in intergalactic space, even between clusters of galaxies.

    And that gas can support sound waves.  It's a vacuum better than we can produce in any laboratory, but it is still not devoid of particles, and those particles do collide from time to time.

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  • 1 month ago

    It is a vacuum, because of the extreme lack of pressure; however, it's not a perfect vacuum, because - as you say - there *are* bits of dust and gas within it. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Depends on you definition of vacuum. Even where there is no ‘dust’ and zero matter/pressure, there is still quantum foam and virtual particles. Also something called dark energy, which is science speak for ‘What the hell is causing that?’

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  • 1 month ago

    Since energy and masses required  space to fill its in, if without space then there is no energy and masses. When the universe being created , energy , masses and space being melted together to become time , in such a way that these four entities must remain together. This means that the atmosphere of the earth required space to fill it in at a certain high, from air to airless zone . To conclude , the space of the universe then being filled in with energy, mass , space and time , then there is no such word as empty space .

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  • ANDY
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    By "dust" we do not mean the one you find in your house on shelves and elsewhere. Neither do we mean the air pollution in our atmosphere...etc. Dust in space is the leftovers after the formation of a star and its planets.

    There is "space" and also " intergalactic space." The former is used generally to indicate the space above our atmosphere and within certain distances. There is "outer space",too, that can be defined as beyond the near space. But usually there is not much difference between the two terminologies.

    However, intergalactic space is the space between galaxies.

    Going to dust. This word describes, as I said above, anything that occupies space (it is matter, then). 

    In outer space and intergalactic space, there IS matter. But its scarcity makes it negligible. Think that in one cubic meter, there are no more than few particles (protons, neutrons, even helium, and other elements─all in a gaseous state of course). The scarcity depends on the whereabouts of space you are talking about. Near a star, for example, the number can go up to thousands per cubic meter.

    Moreover, nebulae are made of "dust". And this dust can result in forming stars.

    In sum, Space is in a vacuum when we consider our own standards on Earth.

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  • 1 month ago

    The vacuum of space refers to the “relative” lack of material in space. 

     

    The Earth's atmosphere doesn't really stop at a certain place and then "space" begins. The air gets thinner as you go up from the surface and the higher the altitude, the thinner it is. It gets thinner still if you leave our solar system but it is always there. 

     

    In reality, no volume of space can ever be perfectly empty. A perfect vacuum with a gaseous pressure of absolute zero is a philosophical concept that does not exist in nature. 

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