does moon revolve around Earth same line as the equator?

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  • 1 month ago

    Not at all

    We would constantly get Solar Eclipses around the Equator every day

    But they line up all over the World

    Even on odd occasions at the Poles

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  • 1 month ago

    No, the moon's orbit is tilted compared to our equator by about 6.7 degrees.

  • 1 month ago

    No.  

    The Moon's orbit is tilted at at 5.15° angle to Earth's orbit, the ecliptic. That means the Moons orbit is tililr at 29.05° to Earth's equator. That is why we do NOT have total lunar and solar eclipses every month. That is also why The Moon's rising and setting azimuths have shifted south in the northern hemisphere. 

    See the diagram here: 

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit_of_the_Moon. 

    The exact amount of tilt depends on which sources you use and whether they are using degrees minutes seconds or decimal degrees as units for the tilts. My addition may be off since I didn't use a calculator. 

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  • 1 month ago

    No, if that were the case nobody would see it unless they lived near the equator. 

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  • KennyB
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The moon's orbit is tilted from the equator by about 5 degrees.  This is the reason we don't have an eclipse every month.

    • ANDY
      Lv 5
      1 month agoReport

      Not from the equator, KennyB, but from the ecliptic.

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  • 1 month ago

    not exactly, the orbit is tilted by 5.14º to the earth's orbital plane and the earth is tilted by 23.44º to that orbital plane, net result is a tilt of the difference, 18.30º, moon orbit to equator.  

    Attachment image
    Source(s): wikipedia
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