Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 1 month ago

Could there be invisible infrared and ultraviolet parts of a rainbow?

11 Answers

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  • Koshka
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    It depends if you are a mosquito or a bee =) 

  • 1 month ago

    Almost certainly.  Though probably less UV than IR because some of those components are screened out by our upper atmosphere.

  • Tom
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Of course----the water drops act as PRISMS---and we get IR and UV on prisms too.  That's how the IR and UV were discovered, people experimenting with prism spectrums.  In one case, the experimenter was measuring the temperature of each color with a thermometer.  The temperature shot up when he laid the instrument to the left of the spectrum next to, but out of the red light.---indicating something there he called INFRA RED.  In the other case an experimenter noticed that some mineral powder, on his desk, from another experiment, GLOWED right next to but beyond the Violet end of the spectrum he was observing----Indicating energy THERE too---He deemed it Ultra Violet Radiation.

  • 1 month ago

    There are. Invisible to naked eye but can be photographed with special filters for IR and UV light.

    https://www.ultravioletphotography.com/content/ind...

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  • 1 month ago

    There could. And there is. Just below the violet arc is an ultraviolet arc. Just about the red arc is an infrared arc. 

  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    there are    

  • Zac Z
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    This question was asked in a physics forum where user "engineer" gave a great answer: https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/185231...

    Not only that but he also links to three pictures taken by Professor Fortes of the  University College London showing the rainbow in the visible range as well as through infrared and UV filters which make the IR and UV parts visible. Good stuff.

  • 1 month ago

    there are, they are invisible.  Refraction affects non-visible light too.

  • 1 month ago

    Yes, as long as the radiation passes through water and the index of refraction differs from those of visible light then they would exist. However an analysis of the raindrop shows that we need total internal reflection to get our rainbow.  So if, for infrared, the refractive index became too low then it would not be reflected

  • 1 month ago

    The electromagnetic spectrum covers electromagnetic waves with frequencies ranging from below one hertz to above 1025 hertz, corresponding to wavelengths from thousands of kilo meters down to a fraction of the size of an atomic nucleus. This frequency range is divided into separate bands, and the electromagnetic waves within each frequency band are called by different names; beginning at the low frequency (long wavelength) end of the spectrum these are: radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays at the high-frequency (short wavelength) end.

    The visible spectrum is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye.A typical human eye will respond to wavelengths from about 380 to 740 nano meters. In terms of frequency, this corresponds to a band in the vicinity of 405–790 THz. The optical window is also referred to as the "visible window" because it overlaps the hum an visible response spectrum. The near infrared (NIR) window lies just out of the human vision, as well as the medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) window, and the long wavelength or far infrared (LWIR or FIR) window, although other animals may experience them.

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