Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 month ago

Can a Jew marry a Christian? What happens to children ?

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  • 1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    Its totally forbidden. Unfortunately our religion doesn't do honor killings but we do disfellowshipping and cutting off of family who leave our religion. In this way, Jews AND Jehovah's Witnesses are EXACTLY the same. Jews are more strict, however.

    Its possible but it would hurt God's feelings so to speak to see a Jew and a gentile of said gentile religion to form an unholy matrimony and relationship. God may kill us for mating with the gentile as what had happened to Noami's family.

    Usually children grow up irreligious. 

    Source(s): Orthodox Jew
  • 1 month ago

    I was pregnant by an Israeli 

    But unfortunately we ended that 

    I had abortion

  • 1 month ago

    If you care about your religion and your future children, you don't put them in that position.

    Source(s): Greek Orthodox Christian
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    According to the law of God, true Christians must unite with the same Christians who have the word of God in common.

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  • 1 month ago

    Religions have always been divisive 

    and hostile towards each other..

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    If the mother is a Jew then the children become Jews. If the mother isn't a Jew then the children become non-Jewish scum.

  • 1 month ago

    1. Yes. What would stop them?

    2. The children grow up having parents from two religions. Were you expecting something else to happen?

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Traditional Judaism does not permit interfaith marriages. The Torah states that the children of such marriages would be lost to Judaism (Deut. 7:3-4), and experience has shown the truth of this passage all too well. The 2000 National Jewish Population Survey found that only a third of interfaith couples raise their children Jewish, despite increasing efforts in the Reform and Conservative communities to welcome interfaith couples, and that statistic hasn't changed, according to a 2017 report.

    This may reflect the fact that Jews who intermarry are not deeply committed to their religion in the first place: if something is important to you, why would you marry someone who doesn't share it? Certainly, the statistics show that intermarried Jews are overwhelmingly less likely to be involved in Jewish activities: 85% of Jewish couples have or attend a Pesach seder, while only 41% of intermarried Jews do; 66% of Jewish couples fast on Yom Kippur while only 26% of intermarried Jews do; 59% of Jewish couples belong to a synagogue while only 15% of intermarried Jews do. These statistics and more are sufficiently alarming to be a matter of great concern to the Jewish community. And the rate of intermarriage has grown dramatically in recent years: according to the Jewish Databank, the rate of intermarriage has risen from 13% in 1970 to 47% since 1996. At the time, the rate of intermarriage seems to have stopped increasing, but it is now at 58% . One Orthodox Jew I know went so far as to state that intermarriage is accomplishing what Hitler could not: the destruction of the Jewish people. That is an extreme view, but it vividly illustrates how seriously many Jews take the issue of intermarriage.

    The more liberal branches of Judaism have tried to embrace intermarried couples, hoping to slow the hemorrhaging from our community, but it is questionable how effective this has been in stemming the tide, given the statistics that intermarried couples are unlikely to have any Jewish involvement or to raise their children Jewish.

    Dennis Prager and Joseph Telushkin provide an excellent discussion of the issues involved in intermarriage in their book The Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism. They note that if the non-Jewish spouse truly shares the same values as the Jewish spouse, then the non-Jew is welcome to convert to Judaism, and if the non-Jew does not share the same values, then the couple should not be marrying in the first place.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I always dreamt to marry a Jewish Israelite as am black. But I found out that Israeli women want men to be circumsised and I found out that they talk very bad about African Americans and Africans. My dream was to marry her but if you are thinking of converting to Christianity good luck. They're harder and tougher than Islam. Most women are lesbians so you know.

    All marriages are mixed marriages. Catholics know this. It does not matter if both partners are committed to the relationship. Actually Catholicism promoted mixed religion marriages.

  • 1 month ago

    Nothing happens to them they live in 21th centery they ll live without religion 

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