Of the 130k deaths attributed to COVID, how many actually died OF it, versus died WITH it?

Here in Colorado there were dozens of cases of people dying of other causes (drinking themselves to death, suicide, etc) but testing positive during autopsies and thus being lumped into the statistics.  How widespread is this?  How many of the deaths were actually caused by Covid, vs a terminal cancer patient on their deathbed and Covid being the straw that broke the camels back?

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Well over 130k died of it.  Those who died of causes such as suicide weren't tested, so their deaths couldn't have been attributed to it.

    In addition, many of those who died from heart attacks and strokes weren't tested either, so their deaths also weren't attributed to it, even though many of them were perfectly healthy just a few weeks early and wouldn't have died or even gotten sick without COVID-19.  It wasn't even the final straw for them -- it was the only straw, but it still wasn't counted.

  • 4 weeks ago

    The majority of cases are people in care homes who were already in their last few days of life.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    This has been a notion which has been circulating on conservative social media for a while.  The theory presented is that covid-19 isn't as deadly as it's been made out because, according to this theory, there are lots and lots of people who are sick with covid but die of unrelated causes and this is being counted in the death rate. 

    Put simply, this is false.  The situation is actually more of the opposite.  To start with, it's not standard to test people who died of things like car accidents, suicides, murders, etc for coronavirus (or any other viruses).  I think people get the wrong idea about autopsies.  These aren't, usually, comprehensive documents of every aspect of someone's health.  Usually they only look at things that seem relevant to the cause of death.  So if someone dies in a car accident they might look for things like whether they were on drugs, or whether they had some sort of health event like a heart attack which caused the accident.  But they're not going to run blood results for corona.  It's also not standard practice to count people who died of unrelated causes as part of a disease's death toll.  Say someone gets a diagnosis of corona, so we know that they have it and then they go home and blow their brains out.  Public health officials would generally not count that in their numbers of covid deaths. 

    The situation is actually more of the opposite of what you suggest.  It's very likely that the official coronavirus death toll is too low, not too high.  That's because the official tally mostly includes people who died in hospitals while being attended by physicians.  There's an untold number of people who may have died of covid at home and who were never tested for it.  A number of covid hotspots from earlier in the year reported dramatically increased death numbers compared to the same time last year.  These numbers are in excess of the official covid death tolls for those areas.  To head off another potential critique, it's unlikely that these increased death numbers are the result of other causes of death increasing dramatically.  Many of those fell during the lockdowns.  For example, traffic fatalities declined quite a bit as many people stayed home and limited their driving.  It seems likely that these increased deaths were the result of covid.  The official number of deaths should be considered a floor and not a ceiling as they only represent the deaths which we know for sure were caused by covid.  The true toll will likely never be known.  If you try to compare covid to other viral outbreaks you'll see that the death tolls for those aren't given in exact numbers but estimated ranges.  That's because, even years after the fact, we don't have precise numbers on everyone who died.  Corona will be the same. 

  • Jim2
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Probably most of them. If the cause of death is listed as coronavirus, it probably was the main cause. 

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Since there has been a 300% increase in influenza and pneumonia, you can call it those.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Is that the latest Trump sheep party line? You are getting pretty desperate.

  • 4 weeks ago

    That's a good question, and if you also didn't already know, many of these deaths may not have ever had it and are listed as having died of it, because many hospitals were pressuring doctors to "suspect" covid-19 even without testing them. Those two doctors from California who blew the whistle about that said they'd never in all their years of being doctors been pressured to state a particular disease as a cause of death on death certificates without doing any testing to confirm until now, and were shocked by it, and then a bunch of people tried to get their videos talking about that banned as "disinformation." Why on earth would these doctors want to lie about that? However, I can see how those pressuring them would want it covered up, so I believe them. And what else is interesting is how flu cases were strong and steady right until the coronavirus pandemic happened, and then suddenly all flu cases miraculously disappeared when they normally have steady rates for at least another month or so. What happened to the flu? Did corona virus kill it and replace it? Don't think so, I just think they stopped testing for it, and then reclassified them as "suspected covid-19 cases."

  • 4 weeks ago

    They all jus killin themselves to make Mr Trump look bad. 

  • 4 weeks ago

    If COVID was the last straw, then they died from it.  

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    129,922 died OF it

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