Are the organic apples that we buy at the supermarket truly organic?

I compared a truly organic apple from my apple tree in my back yard to an “organic” apple from the grocery store by cutting both of them at the same time to see if they would oxidize at the same rate and I was a little shocked by the outcome. My backyard apple took about five mins to start oxidizing whereas the “organic” store bought apple took nearly 30 mins to start oxidizing, and even though it did start oxidizing it was hardly noticeable.

My backyard apple gets super brown super quickly and the store lift one had little brown to speak of and it stayed just like that.. didn’t brown any further. I left it out for a whole day.Needless to say, I’m suspicious and also interested to find out if I have been paying premium price for a food that has been genetically modified and I have been being completely lied to. 

7 Answers

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  • A
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    different varieties of apples will turn brown faster than others, being organic has nothing to do with how quickly it turns brown, it just means that no chemical fertilizers or pesticides have been used

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I don't think you know what “organic” means. It has NOTHING to do with how quickly an apple turns brown when cut in half! 

  • 1 month ago

    It could be due to the variety, some varieties may oxidise faster than others, it depends on the amount of sugar and the amount of acid. Apples all contain naturally occurring sugar and are acidic, but the amount depends on the variety and how ripe the apples were.

  • kswck2
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    As far as I am concerned, just Saying something is Organic is an excuse to raise the price of an item. If I cannot trace how the item is raised-with evidence-i refuse to Buy organic. 

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  • Just because they are organic doesn’t mean the aren’t some super bastardized hybrid that has been bred to retard oxidization. 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    According to the Environmental Working Group, apples are number 4 in the list of fruits and vegetables most likely to be highly contaminated with pesticides. Apples generally contain an average of 4.4 pesticide residues, including some at high concentrations.

  • A.J.
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Your methods do not determine whether pesticides were used.

    Apples come in many varieties, and the time of picking to table will vary highly.

    Iron containing compounds in fruit break down and oxidize when oxygen of the air gets to cells broken in cutting or damage.

    That's the rust color.

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