Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 2 months ago

I could go to the park or I could go to the beach. Does this mean I have 2 choices or 1 choice.?

Update:

For the hard of learning......I have 1 choice. 

12 Answers

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  • Bill B
    Lv 6
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    You have one choice to make:  

      

    Your two options are:  You can go to the park OR You can go to the beach.  

  • HMFan
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You have 1 CHOICE to make from 2 OPTIONS: either the park or the beach.

  • 2 months ago

    Yes, you need to make one choice.  You have two alternatives. 

  • 2 months ago

    You have two choices but choose who where you would like to go :-)

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  • Zapata
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    You have two options but you need only make one choice.

  • 2 months ago

    There are three choices since you can also stay home. Or you could go both places. For those who do not know how to word a question, you need to be more careful in setting limits.

  • fcas80
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    To make things more interesting, in logic, computing, and math there are exclusive or and inclusive or.

    Common language uses exclusive or, meaning, "I could go to the park or the beach, but not both."

    Logic, computing, and math use inclusive or, meaning, ""I could go to the park or the beach, or do both."

  • Rick
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    Only 1, the park is AT the beach !!!!

  • CB
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    2 choices, 1 outcome.

  • Linda
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Neither because you can go wherever your heart desires or stay home.

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