Should we irrigate water from the congo to grow food in the shara there a lot of space for farming ?

Update:

Build a canal like the nile

8 Answers

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  • 2 weeks ago

    Shalom

    What is your budget for such a project. Instead of doing it go to Israel and ask for their assistance. They are prof.

  • 4 months ago

    Hi

    Trilobiteme,

    Yes, you can build canal like the nile

  • 5 months ago

    Doing this would be a huge undertaking, and it's unclear there would be enough water to do it.

    African agriculture certainly has a lot of room for improvement, but there are far more realistic projects that could (and should) be done first. I would recommend other investments before this one. 

  • 5 months ago

    If the only thing that is important to you would be the ability to farm in the Nile, then you probably could conclude that the idea is good, but the real problem is that the changes will occur in a lot bigger area than just the irrigated Nile region and a lot of the changes will be bad.  So, until you know all of the good impacts and all of the bad impacts, you should not make such a change.  It might turn out that you lose worse than you gain.

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    That idea has been discussed here in Australia of bringing water that runs into the sea in the Tropical North where during the wet season floods everywhere, down south into the more drier areas for irrigation and the dwindling city water supplies.  There are problems of the massive cost that no African country can afford and would the amount of water supplied be enough to outweigh the initial canal building costs.  The other problem is the countryside the canal must flow across.  It is all fine if there is a slight downhill run all the way but likely there are hills and mountains along the way which would be nearly impossible to cross with a canal.

  • 5 months ago

    "I had a great-grand-uncle who used to be a lumberjack in the Sahara Forest."

    "But the Sahara is a desert."

    "Yeah, NOW."

    To be serious, transporting water is inefficient and energy-intensive. It might be possible to use desalinated water (solar stills) from the Mediterranean but a big problem is that the locals would destroy vegetation faster than it could be planted. Grass would be grazed down to the roots by sheep (AKA wooly maggots) and saplings cut for fuel.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Who is 'we' and where does 'we' live? And note that the Nile is a river, not a canal. Note also that the Niger River is far closer to the Sahara than the Congo. 

    Please, please look at a map of Africa.

  • 5 months ago

    The Sahara used to be tropical rainforest.  The ancient Egyptians used slash and burn to turn it into arable land to grow barley.  After 20 years, the land turned to desert.  We have the technology to turn it back into rainforest although it would cost a huge amount of money.  If we turned it into farmland, it would become desert again very quickly.

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