How many hours can I work while on SSI and ssdi?

My total monthly income is $804

I'm from NH

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  • Judith
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Hours have nothing to do with it except in figuring your monthly earnings.  The higher your hourly wage the fewer hours you can work to keep your monthly earnings under $1260.  Social Security looks at your monthly income.  The fact that you live in NH is immaterial.  SSI and social security are federal benefits - not state benefits - and the rules and regs are the same nationwide.

    In regards to the SSDI - Social Security considers monthly earnings of $1260 to be gainful employment. Your monthly earnings do not reduce the amount of the SSDI benefit.  You are either entitled to the entire benefit or none at all.  As long as you do not earn $1260 a month your SSDI benefits won't be terminated because of your earnings.

    As for SSI.  To figure out how much will result in a zero SSI payment, multiply your monthly SSI benefit amount by 2 and add $65 - the result is the amount of earnings which will stop you from getting an SSI benefit.  If SSI isn't paid 12 months in a row then the SSI will be terminated.  You would have to file a new claim to become re-entitled.

    I suggest you download two pamphlets - and then read them.  1) What you need to know when you get social security disability and 2) working while disabled:  How we can help.  The last pamphlet refers to both social security and SSI.

    In regards to the SSI - you need to provide SS with proof of your wages on a monthly basis.  You must provide proof of September's earnings by Oct 10th, October's earnings by Nov 10th, etc.  The change in your SSI benefit amount takes place two months after you earned the wage.  September's earnings will reduce the November SSI benefit.

    I was a SS claims rep for 32 yrs.

  • 1 month ago

    Obviously it depends wildly on how much you get paid per hour. If you made $7.50 a hour then you'd be able to work far more hours than if you were paid $20/hr. 

    Source(s): common knowledge
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