Are they both grammatically OK and the same?

A) John won the competition three times in a row.

B) John won three competitions in a row.

Thank you.

6 Answers

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    They could be okay, but the meaning is slightly different. In the first, it appears there was one competition in which John participated three times, but, in the second, it appears there may have been three different competitions.

  • 4 weeks ago

    geezer got it mostly right.  the first means a specific competition (contest or game) that John played, and won, three straight times.  the second says the John played three games or contests, one after the other, and won all three, but it does not say if the contests were identical or different ones.  By saying it the way it was said rather than like in (A), the implication is that there was not just one game or contest, but instead three (perhaps only 2, with one done twice) different ones.  You would say it the first way if it was the same contest every time.

  • geezer
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    They are both ''grammatically'' OK .. but they don't mean the same thing.

    A) means that John won the same competition, every time it was played out, three times in a row, with no one else winning it during that time

    B) just means that John won three different competitions, one after the other.

  • John P
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Both are grammatically correct.

    A means that John won the same competition (maybe an annual competition) those 3 times, without anybody winning it in between.

    B could mean the same thing, but could also mean that John entered 3 different competitions and won all 3 of them, without losing any other competitions in between.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Both appear fine, the second one is more precise, brief.

  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    they both sound okay to me

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