Are students free to choose take any classes available at universities if they wish to?

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  • MS
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago
    Favourite answer

    Kind of.  You can take classes that don't count toward your degree if they are things that interest you.  Most degree programs have some "elective" hours built in, and you can use them for that.  Taking too many of these classes that don't count could delay your graduation though.  Some students are also admitted as non-degree-seeking students, meaning they just want to take some classes, but aren't working toward a degree (in some cases, they take classes that count toward required continuing education for their fields).  Those students are often taking things that just interest them.  Some classes do have prerequisites - classes that you must take before you can take them.  So you can't just choose to take a class if you haven't taken the prerequisites for it.  

  • 3 weeks ago

    You can choose to take any class for which you meet the prerequisites.  So to answer your question no, but yes.  You are free to take whatever classes you like, but only if you have taken the classes you need to take before taking those classes.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Usually no. That is true even if you are a non degree seeking continuing education student. When I went back to college after dropping out of graduate?school for 7. years as non degree seeking student, the only reason I could take graduate level courses was I had already taken a lot of graduate level courses, more than enough for a masters degree. 

    There is a limit to how many courses you can take as a non degree seeking student. I became a degree seeking student after two semesters and earned a third bachelors degree in another 2 semesters. I already had a B.S. in geology from another university and college. Physical geography and geology are both interdisciplinary. Yes, I had to take 2 cultural geography courses. I had the science and math background. I had to retake calculus 3 because it had been more than 5 years?since I had taken and passed calculus 4 and 5 at the same university. Then I was insane enough to go back to graduate school to earn a slightly different master's degree. None of my graduate credit transferred from my original masters degree program. Those courses were too old. 

    Even if you take placement tests and place out of introductory level math or science classes, you didn't used to get college credit for the classes you place out of. I was put into 3rd semester French for my first bachelors degree. There was 5 semester foreign language requirement at that time that be came 3 semester requirement that was done away with by the time I went back for my second bachelors degree.  

  • Neil
    Lv 4
    4 weeks ago

    Any, pobably not. Fot exaple, a first year undergraduate likely won't be allowed to take a graduate cllass. Many classes have prerequisites, and if you haven't taken the prereqs you can'ttake te class.

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  • edward
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Not any class.  Specifically, the grades have to be good enough to get in.  Not all faculties have the same admission requirements.  

  • 4 weeks ago

    no.  you must meet the prerequisites for any class and some are limited to students in specific programs only, or even by invitation only.  Example: at graduate level, there are 'proseminars' in various subjects that are limited to people in the relevant doctoral programs and nearby ones.  Tom, Dick, or Harry from undergrad programs or other subject areas are not admitted.

  • drip
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Not if you want to graduate. You must declare a major and take the required classes for that major. In the US you must take general education classes. There is some leeway. You may need to take two math classes but have eight different math classes to pick from.   There usually is some wiggle room in your schedule to take a few electives of your choice. 

  • ?
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Not really. There are requirments that you have to meet to take more advanced classes, such as previous classes satisfactorily completed, and sometimes concurrent classes (they wont let you take comp sci classes without some math classes in the same year). Theres some basic guidelines and limitations in place to push you into some sort of degree. You cant just show up, study whatever you like and drop out

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