Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 2 weeks ago

If you want your writing to be taken seriously by a current, modern audience, is the "F" word an essential part of your vocabulary?

If you want to establish yourself as trendy, current and cutting edge, is it mandatory to include a few choice "F" words in your review, article, opinion piece or blog post? At the very least, make use of the abbreviation "AF" (for "as F word").  I just get the feeling that without using the "F" word a few times in their article, an author will struggle for credibility with a young, savvy audience and be lumped in with the laughably outdated Boomer writers who did not know of the eloquent power and impact of the "F" word.

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  • L
    Lv 5
    1 week ago

    Swear language is NEVER necessary!!!

  • Anonymous
    2 weeks ago

    no........................

  • 2 weeks ago

    Nonsense!  Ignoring my nonfiction books, I have four fiction books in print, with no use of the F word, and exactly one offensive word (N) used once by a character immediately depicted as scum (he shoots an unarmed man in the back).

  • chorle
    Lv 7
    2 weeks ago

    It does seem using the F word is  likely the shortest effing way to limit your potential effing audience

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    2 weeks ago

    The use of coarse language in written work is a big turn-off for me.

  • Anonymous
    2 weeks ago

    Excuse me, but I take offense at "laughably outdated Boomer writers who did not know of the eloquent power and impact of the 'F' word."

    I'm a boomer and a published novelist. I am also the winner of a recent silly contest on Twitter in which writers counted the number of times the F word appears in their book. The series I'm doing has a character who uses it a lot in dialogue and when it's in that character's point of view, also thinks it often. I no longer remember my number from the first book of a trilogy, but it was north of 500 and did not include past tense, present participles, or gerunds based on that word. I suspect I'd have hit at least 800 counting all forms.

    So I don't think you know jack about how Boomers write, or about whether that word is necessary for a work to seem relevant. (I have entire novels without it, too, of course.)

  • Anonymous
    2 weeks ago

    Of course not.  The Harry Potter books are among the best sellers of all time, and they don't have cursing in them.  The same is true of tons of modern novels.  Context matters.  Use of language depends upon the target audience as well as what's most natural for the characters.

  • 2 weeks ago

    No, swearing put in just for the randomness of including it isn't needed.  If it doesn't further the plot it is considered fluff. 

  • 2 weeks ago

    Not at all. It depends on your audience and your topic, and I would even say that for a review, article, opinion piece, or blog post, the F-word is never essential.

  • Marli
    Lv 7
    2 weeks ago

    The F word is not eloquent and it has been so overused that it has lost its power.  I am a "laughably outdated Boomer".  I know my generation has spoken and written the F word since we were "young and savvy". The wartime generation used it too.

    It is the expletive used by people who have no other word in their limited vocabularies to express their feelings.

    It means "sex". I don't know how it can be applied to anything else as an expletive. "Damn" is a better curse word.

    Use it if you think your character would say it.  I won't think your character is intelligent or savvy. Quite the opposite of both. But if the character is the type who says it, I won't stop its publication.

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