Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 month ago

How are Americans honestly still proud of their country? From both a conservative and a liberal perspective, it has gone seriously astray?

America is one of the most deeply divided societies in existence, being neither truly conservative or genuinely liberal, belonging to neither

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  • 1 month ago

    Conservatives are reuniting America.

    We won’t let Democrats divide us.

    Trump 2020.

    We don’t see race we see Americans that are tired of Democrats and the media trying to divide us with their race war propaganda.

    Kamala Harris thinks burning black owned businesses is necessary.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    My last few favorite candidates for President represent moderation. I am a militant moderate. Nothing wrong with that. Because society can never be truly served by either philosophy, on it's own.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Because most Americans are neither far right or far left we do not want Marxism or communism we also do not want the Pope or and Church telling us what to do we want to live our lives before we die and this is being taken away from us with mass poverty and forced opinions Americans are getting very angry because we are being forced to live in a civil war no one wants but the government and media 

  • 1 month ago

    Being able to have our differences and still exist is what makes the US great. No matter how much that may upset the Marxist-socialist democrats, conservatism and capitalism aren't going away.

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  • 1 month ago

    We have had periods of division before. One political economist and historian argues that we are in one of those usual periods where one system is coming to a close and the next system is in its infancy. The old system was the one established at the end of WWII. It served us well--sort of--for about 6 decades, but it has been steadily unraveling at least since the late 1970s. It would take too long to get into many details, but suffice it to say the global economic system was based on an idea of spreading markets would lead to spreading democracy. For a while, it seemed to work, but it was based on Western ideas of how markets and societies were to operate. As non-Western societies joined the economic club and as issues such as climate change and the limits of unending growth were made manifest, the system has been unable to address the problems it has created. Increasingly, the old fixes to problems will be less and less effective and people will become more and more frustrated with politics as usual. One danger is a move towards authoritarianism.  

    The new system will likely begin focusing on economic development from the bottom up rather than top-down. The model has positive implications for other countries, but understand the USA is a massive continental nation with upwards of 330 million people. You could put Germany into Montana; Texas is roughly the size of France, just to give context. How do you create economic opportunity and encourage participatory democracy in a nation so vast in size and population? Russia has centralized power in Moscow, as has China in Beijing. 

    America may have another option which could serve as a counter balance. The model that political economist sees developing involves the creation of locally based businesses along the lines of the Cleveland Model. Create a capital availability system (like a super-credit union) to create worker owned businesses, cooperatives, coordination with small and family owned businesses to assure broad-based economic ownership and maximum participation, locally. Issues which cannot be handled well locally would be bumped up to a state or regional level, with the national level for the most complex problems and would serve as a technical clearinghouse for ideas. This doesn't mean large businesses and institutions would necessarily go away, but they may have to tailor their behaviors to the needs of the local communities. Local communities, in return for this devolution of power, would have to agree to encourage maximum local participation economically, socially and politically, promote/protect human rights (we have a nasty history here in the US with the idea of local control or states' right being a code for power in the hands of local elites--usually whites--that has to end), and create local ways of protecting and even healing the local environment. 

    Anyway, all that to say, I think they are on to something. Here is a link you might find interesting. Granted, it is very USA focused, but there is nothing that says other countries and localities cannot develop their own.     

  • Phil
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    we live in interesting times.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Because millions of us are moderates that don't want far right or far left leadership.

  • garry
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    are you still fighting a war you shouldnt , are body bags of dead soldiers coming , yes your proud you dont have  a war or do democrats want a war ????

  • 1 month ago

    America is fine. These political parties and the media seem to make it out to be in awful shape!  It is still the most prosperous country in the world.

  • 1 month ago

    Lets put it this way. The word Liberal does not mean what it did 50 years ago. The people who call themselves Liberal today have no historical understanding of that word. I'm an Independent Conservative. I have more in common with a Liberal from 1970 than modern Liberals do. 

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