Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsOutdoor RecreationHunting · 2 months ago

How to improve aim and draw skills when firing a handgun?

11 Answers

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  • Quinn
    Lv 6
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    I'm going to disagree with the others.  Practice by itself is not going to improve your skills.  It takes PROPER practice to do that.  If you don't know anything about proper technique, how is doing something over and over suppose to make it perfect?  If you don't know, then you don't know when you make a mistake.

    Practice does not make perfect. Practice makes permanent.  This means if you practice incorrectly, you are imprinting incorrect technique into your mind. And the consequences of that is you will do it wrong more readily and faster because that incorrect technique would had been trained to the point of reflex. And even when you realize it is wrong, you won't been able to stop yourself from doing it. And it will take even longer to unlearning or break yourself from it.

    If you don't know what you are doing, find someone who does and learn from them.

  • 2 months ago

    If you can mount a laser to your handgun, do so and have it zeroed. Load the weapon with snap caps and use the laser dot to quickly line up on a target after drawing (I use something about the size of a quarter at 5 yards). Practice keeping the laser dot on the quarter-sized target while squeezing the trigger - this helped me to keep a steady hand and proper grip while firing multiple shots with a revolver!

  • Phil
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    You know how to get to Carnegie Hall don't you?

    Practice.

  • Mr.357
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Training.  Practice.

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Practice has been well said but a bit of advice. I was into fastdraw pretty heavy a long time ago and learned from other`s mistake. Practice with a gun loaded with dummy rounds so the weight will be consistent. An acquaintance of mine practiced several months with empty colt s/a revolver and got dang fast, however, the day came for live ammo....sad....the six .45 Cowboy Colts slowed his draw down but the hammer and trigger timing stayed put and the bullet from the first shot took a chunk out of his right calf. Just the weight of 6 cartridges was enough to cancel months of practice. 

  • L.N.
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Practice, practice, practice. But if you are not confident in your technique, get some training so that you are not practicing bad habits.

  • 2 months ago

    I would agree, practice as often as possible until you reach your desired degree

    of skill. Good luck.

  • 2 months ago

    I bought a gun belt and a .22 Cowboy Six Shooter, for cheap practice. There IS good reason for the shape of those "Hog Legs". A couple hundred rounds, and you get pretty good at soda cans : )

    HOWEVER, for safety sake NEVER, NEVER practice "drawing" with a loaded gun. It is just too dangerous and many learned this the hard way.

    An old photo from one of the old regulars here Welcome to America

    Attachment image
  • Robin
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Practice with blanks and balloons 

  • C T M
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Practice. It's just that simple.

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