Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceInsurance · 2 months ago

Will my Medicaid Expansion health insurance be taken away when I get my first $15 hr. paycheck?

I had to leave my job in March to take care of my mom.  My mom got worse and is needing someone to stay with her 24/7.  Since March my income has been $0.  In October I qualified for Medicaid Expansion.  Not something I'm proud of but my health insurance from work ran out and I couldn't afford $600 per month insurance.

My mom was paying an agency $30 per hour for home care but her money ran out and now she qualifies for Medicaid Waiver.  She applied for the wrong program first and was only approved for 4.5 hours of home care per week.  Now we have her on the correct program and she qualifies for 35 hours per week.  The Medicaid office told me they thought I could get $15 per hour to do what I have been doing since March.

My total income for 2020 will be about $6,000.  If I start this, I would get my first paycheck sometime in December depending on how fast they process billing forms.  If what they tell me is true, I will make $525 before taxes every week.  My first check comes long after open enrollment has ended.  Medicaid Expansion is for people who make less than $17,000 per year and their employer doesn't offer insurance.  

Will Medicaid Expansion take away my health insurance when I receive my first paycheck or will I just keep it until next open enrollment?  This assumes I won't get insurance from an employer before then.

Update:

It's important to understand, my mom gets a caregiver for 35 hours per week but I'm not guaranteed 35 hours.  If they have an agency come in for 16 hours respite, then I lose those 16 hours and only get paid for 19 hours which doesn't make sense since I'm expected to check out when my time is up but my mom still needs help getting to the bathroom, etc.  In other words, I put in much more than 35 hours, there is no way she could have someone for only 8 hours a day and 5 days a week.

Update 2:

So, it would make more sense if I put my mom in the nursing home and Medicaid had to pay $7,000 a month for 24 hour nursing care?  I thought this was saving taxpayers money since my mom can't be by herself any longer but I guess I was mistaken.

Update 3:

To the gaywad A. Hunch, you have your head so far up your butt hole......You seem to have me mixed up with somebody else but your too stupid to realize it.  Maybe you should get somebody more competent to answer your questions next time.

3 Answers

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  • car253
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    So sorry someone was mean to you.    You are right it saves taxpayers a lot of money by paying you instead of a nursing home that charges $10,000 a month.   Taxpayers save millions of dollars with the In Home Support Program.   

    You will have to ask Medicaid how much is too much before they cut off your health insurance.    And, be careful because if you own the home,  after your mom dies, Medicaid can come after you for repaying them for the healthcare unless you are disabled yourself.    That means the possible forced selling of your home.

    A lot depends on what state you live in.   So, you may want to post your state for more help. 

    So sorry for what your going through.  I know how tough that is.  

    Source(s): Insurance Agent
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Medicaid TROLL.  Reported.  Thanks for the 2 points.

  • 2 months ago

    Any change in income you have to report to medicaid. 

    If that makes you ineligible for the program, then you will qualify for a special enrollment period.  This will allow you to purchase coverage through your state's marketplace or directly through an insurance company for 60 days following the change in income.

    You need to check with medicaid to see if the income reporting is required when you earn the money vs when you are paid the money.

    "If they have an agency come in for 16 hours respite, then I lose those 16 hours and only get paid for 19 hours which doesn't make sense since I'm expected to check out when my time is up but my mom still needs help getting to the bathroom, etc."

    - Do you think it makes sense that we (the tax payers) pay relatives a dime to care for their loved ones in their home?   It eliminates a check and balance system, creating limited oversight into the quality of care.

    Based on your prior questions, your mom is in her late 80s or early 90s (I don't remember which).  Which places you, at least around 50.  Besides the house you were gifted, do you have any other savings or investments?  What is your plan with your own situation?

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