Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsZoology · 2 months ago

Question about the dinosaurs?!?!?!?

I heard the dinosaurs died long ago because of some asteroid thing.. I’m wondering how could it kill them all like with the after effects? Why didn’t they just migrate to a different part of the world and build lives there.. why did the dinosaurs all die? They were bigger than humans so capable of doing more than us and eating new things and stuff.. why did they die? 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    We know that the death cloud reached the poles, ie everywhere. Between being the farthest place on Earth from the Yucatan impact site and the coldest, darkest area, where the local dinosaurs could, should & would have been best adapted, USED to these conditions  

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Maybe asteroids caused a pole-shift, and altered Earths gravity. Only the smaller creatures would've survived.

  • 2 months ago

    It did not kill all of them. Two lineages of birds survived.  It affected the whole world, and killed most living things.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicxulub_impactor

  • 2 months ago

    They all died because that one astroid created heat and dust worldwide.  Our Great Vacuum Cleaner Jupiter did not do its job.

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  • 2 months ago

    It was big enough to fill the air with dust and all the larger animals suffocated.

    The dust/cloud blocked the sun causing a global freezing that killed even more.

    A lot of earth was scowered of vegetation so less oxygen and what animals survived in caves, underground and seas, evolved and adapted to animals of today, including humans. Being big doesn't always mean better at surviving.

  • 2 months ago

    The asteroidal impact caused a global environment event.  Dinosaurs, being cold-blooded, could not survive the climate change.  Warm-blooded animals and anything living in oceans or deep lakes would have survived.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    The giant meteor that struck the earth packed the energy of one BILLION atomic bombs. The energy heated the temperature on the ground to hundreds of degrees. Since no animal can survive temperature above 50 deg. C. The temperature alone wiped out practically all animals living on the ground. None of them survived unless they can escape the heat. There were 2 ways to escape the heat.

    1. Below ground. Since heat rises, temperature underground is safe for animals like lizards, salamanders, snakes, shrews, toads, and rodent-like mammals called the multituberculaes. 

    2. in or near the water. Since water takes a lot of energy to increase in temperature, aquatic and semi-aquatic animals survived. For example, frogs, turtles, crocodilians, newts, fish, platypus, and shorebirds were able to survive. 

    Dinosaurs were too big to hide underground and that is why all of them were completely wiped out, along with all enantiornithine birds (the dominant land birds of the age of dinosaurs), pterosaurs (flying reptiles), and some marsupial mammals that lived above ground in North America. The impact also threw up lots of molten rock and when they fell back down to earth, they ignited world wide forest fires. All dinosaur fossils are found below a layer of soot that were the remains of the plants that were burned. That means all dinosaurs were completely wiped out even before the forest fires stopped burning. The smoke and soot were so bad that they blocked out the sun and stopped photosynthesis and created what scientists call "nuclear winter"  Some scientists believe that nuclear winter killed the dinosaurs off because they had nothing to eat. The truth is that they were all dead by the time nuclear winter arrived, so it makes no difference to them whether there was nuclear winter or not. 

  • 2 months ago

    Aside from the hypothesized fire and/or impact winter effects, the impact would have created a dust cloud that blocked sunlight for up to a year, inhibiting photosynthesis. Omnivores, insectivores, and carrion-eaters survived the extinction event, perhaps because of the increased availability of their food sources. No purely herbivorous or carnivorous mammals seem to have survived. Rather, the surviving mammals and birds fed on insects, worms, and snails, which in turn fed on detritus (dead plant and animal matter). The largest air-breathing survivors of the event, crocodyliforms and champsosaurs, were semi-aquatic and had access to detritus. Modern crocodilians can live as scavengers and survive for months without food, and their young are small, grow slowly, and feed largely on invertebrates and dead organisms for their first few years. These characteristics have been linked to crocodilian survival at the end of the Cretaceous.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    The aftereffects of the asteroid impact was a global event. There was nowhere to go that was not effected. They weren't killed outright from the asteroid, but over the years the darkening of the sky and changing climate killed vegetation and disrupted the food webs. Large carnivores and herbivores alike were unable to survive. Smaller animals survived because they were able to maintain breeding numbers even with the reduced food supplies. 

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