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?
Lv 5
? asked in EnvironmentGreen Living · 2 months ago

Since the grid is so unreliable, isn't it more reliable and cheaper to go wind/solar?

It's a one time cost. 

9 Answers

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  • 2 weeks ago

    The grid isn't unreliable. And it's not a 1 time cost.Everything breaks down eventually.When they say oil and gas is not renewable it's ridiculous because we have a hundred yrs worth in the ground.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    That depends a lot on where you are. Wind is most reliable in the Midwest and Great Plains, sometimes at the shore or on a mountain. Solar is reliable in AZ, more than in AK. Other forms of renewable energy are reliable in different places. Generally, the grid is more reliable than any one of them. However, Texas set up its own grid to avoid federal regulation. They are paying the price.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The grid distributes electricity however it is generated. It is the wires cables and pylons etc not the power generation itself. 

    Underground cables are less likely to be disrupted by the weather but are way more expensive to install .

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes it is. For several years now renewables have been cheaper. The challenge is to get people and municipalities to switch over to something different. They are to accustomed to things as they are. Some changes in policy to make the switch more compelling would be beneficial. 

  • ?
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    @ BB- My wind and solar travels from the generators to the inverters and converters to the batteries to my appliances. You know how many CEO salaries I'm NOT contributing to? 

    @ y- True, but a payment plan puts the entire upfront cost into terms of about 8 years of utility bills, w/o the price hikes. 

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Everything is unreliable, reliability of the grid depends on how much you are willing to invest in it.  When Obama talked about improving the grid and creating a "smart grid" republicans were against it.

    However, if you live in Texas, rooftop solar, with battery backup would be feasible.  It is even cost effective.  I just build my first small battery (7kWh) and it would be quite possible to scale that to 70kWh (enough for 2 -4 days) and would cost about 12,000. Charging the battery with solar (including taxes) would add another 7 ,000 dollars.  This would be a DIY system for under 20,000, or 1,000 per year, no subsidies required.

    Not every one is willing to do that, most of us prefer to rely on the grid and make everything some one else's problem.  The good news is that solar panels are now 30cents per Watt, batteries are continuing to drop in price and the electronic equipment required are getting better and cheaper.  The bad news is that all this is not happening in the US and we have to import it from China, which is leading the way.

  • y
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Up front more expensive, not nearly as reliable as fossil, in the long run it would break even, some states are now taxing those who tossed solar on the land,

    Just imagine if even a fraction of the cost to build the solar and wind in Texas had gone into natural gas infrastructure. It would have meant the supply wold only be down the 25% now.  Becouse there wouldn't have been a need to tank NG in to power plants and such. They would be all set.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    That depends a lot on where you are. Wind is most reliable in the Midwest and Great Plains, sometimes at the shore or on a mountain. Solar is reliable in AZ, more than in AK. Other forms of renewable energy are reliable in different places. Generally, the grid is more reliable than any one of them. However, Texas set up its own grid to avoid federal regulation. They are paying the price.

  • BB
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    And exactly how do you think wind, fossil fuel and solar power gets to homes and businesses??

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